Interview with Patty Samuelian – English and Spanish

This is Lighthouse 112, the podcast from the superintendent of schools in North Shore School District 112. We’re a pre-K through eight public school district in Northeast Illinois. This podcast is a source of information about the school district, it’s leadership, it’s teachers, it’s students, and it’s community. It’s another source of updates, and an additional source of news regarding the changing narrative of public education. Inspire, innovate, engage.

Thank you for stopping by Lighthouse 112. Today, we’re interviewing Patty Samuelian, mentor teacher, teacher on special assignment in North Shore School District 112, longtime member of the staff, and all around great person. Patty, it is so wonderful to have you here today. Today, we’re going to share with our listeners more about your journey, your story, your career aspirations, your proud moments, and really, your thoughts on anything that you would like to talk about. So it is a pleasure to add you to the list of district 112 folks featured on Lighthouse 112, our podcast. One day, I’d love to see everybody here.

So, do us a favor and say who you are, and let us get started right now. Thank you, Patty.

Great. Well, thank you so much for having me. I’m really honored to be a part of your podcast group. Yeah, it’s very exciting to be here.

Awesome. Well, we may as well just start at the beginning. So your leadership story probably starts with some of the early influencers. Why don’t you give us a little bit of a view into the world of Patty?

Absolutely. You know, when you asked me to think about my leadership story, it’s a question that I never had before so it was quite therapeutic to back up, and think about the last 32 years in education, first of all. But, I really have to go further back, to my upbringing, when I talk about my leadership story, and people who influenced me and who I am today.

First, I guess I go back with my parents. They are both huge influences in my life, and I get my integrity from both of them. I really think about my emotions and my empathy, I get from my mom. And my tireless work ethic, from my dad. My dad was such a hard worker, and he taught us, and raised us on quotes like, “Lead by example.” “Be kind and give back to others.” And, “do things right, or don’t do them at all.” I really try to do those things each and every day of my life.

I think those are great tributes to your mom and dad, and even those are great shout outs to the values, the core values that we get instilled upon us at a young age, which is wonderful.

Now, did you ever think of a journey, career, or calling other than education? Or, did you always know that you were called to teach?

Yes, I always knew I was called to teach. My mom even goes back to when I was a little girl, and I set up school in my basement, I was always attracted to kids, and helping them. So there was never, ever a question in my mind about my teaching.

I went to a very small school in Dubuque, Iowa, where I got a double major in special education and elementary education. My first teaching job was in Waukegan, at West Elementary School in 1988.

Wow.

Two people there, that … Yeah.

That’s wonderful. Now, you’ve got your mom and dad, you’ve got your influences growing up, you’ve got an amazing set of core values. You choose Loras College, and that’s in Dubuque, Iowa, and you double majored in special ed and elementary ed. I’d say this is pretty impressive already, I appreciate that, Patty. I really do, and I appreciate you taking us back to Waukegan School District 60. Were there some important people that you met there?

Absolutely. You know, I met a lot of important people. Your first two years of your career are ones that you’ll never forget. But, two people that really stand out to me was, number one, a man by the name of Robert Abbott. He was the head of special education in Waukegan, and he was just this gentle and kind man, who had so much passion and love for what he did, and the work he did with kids with special needs. I just felt his positive energy every time I was around him, and it just made me want to be better for my students.

Then, the second person who really influenced me was my principal at the time, who was Neil Codell. He just taught me the importance of taking time, every day, to stop and personally connect with people, be kind, and be a good listener. He made it his … He was such a busy man, but every morning he would stop, and welcome every single staff member, both at West Elementary, and then later in Highland Park with me as well.

Neil Codell is somewhat of a legend in district 111 first, and then in 112, right? Then, he went onto be a superintendent in district 219, so we also had children who attended Allen Place, when I worked there. So, I can’t wait to hear more about Neil. And, I think all of our listeners are going to look and find out, how did you go from Loras College, Waukegan, and now Northwood? Tell us a little bit about how that happened.

Absolutely. At the end of my second year in Waukegan, Mr. Codell, my principal, came to me and said he was taking another job. And, as hard as it was to leave Waukegan, he had this great opportunity in Highland Park, and he wanted me to come along with him because he had an opening for a special ed teacher. I just really loved his leadership style, and I knew I could learn so much from him, so I left Waukegan and found myself teaching middle school, special education, at Northwood Junior High in Highland Park, which at the time was district 111.

Wow. Now, first of all, I don’t know how somebody who is barely 35 years old like yourself could have been in education for 35 years, so I’m still trying to do the math here. But, tell us a little bit about your Northwood experiences? I know that your Waukegan years influenced you, and I know that wonderful leaders influence you, and I think it’s so neat that we know you now as a wonderful leader, who is influencing so many people. So I assure you, the early days, and early influences are coming out in how you’re helping so many of our teachers.

So keep going, Patty, tell us about some of the other experiences that you’ve had?

Great. Well, thanks for that compliment. But, you’re right, there’s so many people that you meet along your journey, and especially me, that really influenced me.

I taught at Northwood from 1990 to 2014, and I pretty much taught all three grade levels, but for the most part I stayed in the sixth grade, which was my favorite grade. I love that transition between fifth and sixth grade. I taught all five academics, in a self contained or small group class, as well as resource. I even got to teach one gen ed section of sixth grade one year, that’s where my little gen ed comes in, and that was very exciting. They had an over spill class, and I took it on and I absolutely loved it.

Wonderful.

Then, really some people that stand out to me as people that really contributed to who I am today, throughout those years were, number one, my mentor Norma Cohen, who was a special ed teacher who took me under her wing, and taught me everything. She just spent endless, tireless hours showing me the way, and she was kind, and patient, and professional. It’s what I needed, as a new teacher, and I model myself after her every day. I still talk to Norma all the time, she’s one of my dearest friends. She’s actually still subbing at Northwood, which I can’t believe. She’s so dedicated, and I love that about her.

She’s a wonderful lady, absolutely I’ll echo those sentiments, absolutely. Very nice.

Yeah. Then, other people that really had a strong role in who I am today are my students. I taught so many kids, and the kids that I taught struggled academically, and sometimes emotionally, and it was really up to me as a teacher to grow, and learn, and figure out. I believed in each one of them, I always had high expectations for them. I was honest, trustworthy, I cared to connect with who they were as people. And, I had to understand their unique needs, and figure out how to teach them. They helped me through that process, and I owe so much of my growth to my students.

I think that’s beautiful.

I remember, years ago, when I was teaching at Elm Place, my first year I had the privilege of co-teaching with Jan Copperthorn. Jan was the [crosstalk 00:10:33] teacher, I was the social studies teacher, and we wanted everyone in the class to know that we were both the teachers. So, we described what our roles were, Jan said she was the expert at teaching and learning, and how the brain worked. And I was the expert in history, and civics. That way, we knew who everybody was, and what everybody’s needs were, but that way we partnered up, and it was our way of approaching it. So I love the fact that your students played such a huge role in shaping who you are, because they really do impact us, and they really do know what they need. It’s really neat when we can figure that out, too, as their teachers to help meet their needs. I love it.

Keep going, I love your story, Patty. This is great stuff. Thank you.

Sure. Well, absolutely, and just like you, my peers are also big influencers. They’re those co-teachers, or there’s multiple teachers and para professionals that I’ve met along my journey, who I’ve stolen ideas from, and I tried to mimic the traits that made them special.

Just as my peers, my administrators, I think I had multiple APs and principals, I think they changed almost every three to four years when I was at Northwood. But, when you meet people along the way, you grab onto all those positive things that they have. For those really strong ones, they helped me see the value in being organized, being a good communicator, being kind, and having accountability, and really that passion, and that clear vision along the way. I was there a long time, and I had some great, great people that I learned from.

Well, you are such a people person, and I can’t wait until we’re back working, in person, so I can see you every day. It’s very difficult being remote for so long, I know it’s taking a toll on all of us. But, I think it’s so wonderful that you’re sharing not only the journey of a teacher, the depth of a teacher, but the heart of a teacher. Because not only do we celebrate work, and we celebrate career, and we celebrate profession, all of that is wonderful, but we also celebrate our lives.

Will you do us a favor, and take us through a little bit of your life milestones that also took place during the nearly quarter century, when you had your first phase in district 112, over at Northwood?

Absolutely. Well, in my first two years in Waukegan, I actually met my husband, who was a teacher there. So, that was a little tricky because I was leaving, and I left him behind. But later, we did get married.

Through my time at Northwood, I got my Master’s in special education, I took a bunch of additional 45 credit hours of graduate work. I had two kids, and I was involved in so many things at Northwood. I really took it to heart to be a part of the school, and I was very passionate and loved my school. I mean, I grew up there, and I loved every minute of it.

Well, in a recent podcast interview, we had Principal Sergio Gonzalez, who said that he’s learned very quickly, in his first year as principal, that once you’re a Husky, you’re always a Husky. He said he learned that pretty much in his first couple weeks on the job at Northwood.

Absolutely, it’s a very, very special group of people. You know, as I get to know all the staff, and all the different buildings, there’s special people everywhere. But, it will always hold a special place in my heart, of a place that I grew up and learned so much there.

I had said I had been involved in a lot of things at Northwood, but I think the two major things that I was involved in, that drove my leadership story to a whole new direction, was being a mentor and a team leader. Many people think I have an administrative endorsement, but I don’t. I never really had a goal to be an administrator, but I really found myself loving these teacher leadership roles, like mentoring, and being a team leader. When the teacher on special assignment role was posted in 2014, it was loudly speaking to me, and so I applied for that role, and luckily got it.

I’m glad you did. And I really appreciate you pointing out, you don’t need to be a licensed administrator with your type 75, or whatever it is nowadays, you’re a leader. You’re an influencer of people, you’re an educator, you’re a teacher, your actions are what matter so much. As others have helped you, and guided you, and coached you, I find so impressive and so affirming, Patty, is that you pay it forward literally, figuratively, and every day I’m grateful that we’ve got this teacher on special assignment position. And I think it’s wonderful that you’re a leader, yet you’re not an administrator, and you’re freed up of having some of the burdens that are placed upon people with that title, or with that license.

You’re free, you’ve got so much ownership of the mentor program, you’ve got such ownership of teachers starting, and figuring it out, and finding their paths. And you’re just a trusted confidant, and really an incredible asset to our district. I think some folks out there might say, “Okay, I sort of get it.” But, can we talk a little bit more specifically, like what does a teacher on special assignment do? And what are some of the particulars that you do? I think some folks are going to find this fascinating.

Absolutely. Well, I was really placed in a unique position because there was no position before. So I was nervous, but I was even more excited to develop this role that I had dreamed about. I mean, really when you talk about me with those nice qualities, it’s really easy for me, and I feel like it’s a very natural position for me to be in, to just help others. It makes me feel really good, so that’s why I really jumped at the opportunity to apply for this position.

Really, the position has four main parts, and they’re all helping in nature. The first biggest role is the district 112 mentor program coordinator. In the mentor program coordinator role, I create and organize the program, and all the materials, and trainings necessary. I place all new staff members with mentors, I oversee and train all the mentors. I act as a secondary mentor to all of our special ed staff, because they have quite a unique role where they’re case manager and teacher, so I really help with the case manager role of that. Then, I oversee all new staff, in general, by collaborating with the mentors regularly. So that’s one part of the job, and that’s the biggest hat that I wear.

Then, I do have three other little hats as well. I’m a guest teacher coordinator, where I train and interview all of our wonderful guest teachers, and I communicate with them regularly through newsletters, and emails, and things like that. Another hat that I wear is I’m a student teacher coordinator, so I work with the universities, local universities, to help place student teachers. Which I love, because I feel like anytime we can give back to new educators, and help train and mold them, will just be great for our organization and students. Then, my last hat that I wear is that I call myself a licensure liaison, and basically I try to understand all the changes that are happening at ISBE, their procedures and renewal process, and professional development. And I work to help our staff keep up with all of those changes, and make sure their renewals go through seamlessly.

Wow.

That’s it, in a nutshell.

Those are incredible hats, and I appreciate your licensure liaison ship, because you gently reminded me I needed to renew my license, which I did, everything’s good.

Good.

Our teachers are lucky to have you, our administrators are lucky to have you. I think other people listening today are going to say, “Wait a minute. How on Earth do you do all that?” It’s because we have Patty. Patty was developed by great leaders, she is a great leader, she clearly has great parents who supported her. I’m sure that Jack and Gina are benefiting from your leadership, too.

Right now, you’re officially housed out of the personnel office, or Deputy Superintendent Schrader’s office. Talk to us a little bit about Dr. Shrader, and her influences on you, please?

Absolutely, she has been a huge part of my leadership story. Because some people might not know, but she was my last principal at Northwood, and now my boss. She really trusted me to take this new position and run with it. She knew my style because she was my principal for so many years, and she knows that my mind is constantly racing with all new ideas, and how to make things better. So she just said, “Here are the responsibilities,” and really trusted me to develop the program, and she’s just been by my side the whole time.

She’s helped me learn a lot, and she’s been an amazing mentor to me. But, I think the two things that really stand out for me, that I use every day in my life is that, number one, she always encouraged me, and all our other staff members, to come to her with any problem. She’d say, “You can come to me with a problem, but also come to me with possible solutions.” That leadership advice really just pushes me every day, to always think beyond the problem and be creative, because there’s always a way to figure it out. Even though sometimes we have some restraints, we can figure out anything if we can be creative.

Then, really secondly, she just always encourages me to run my ideas past other colleagues, and really collaborate. This, I find invaluable be I’ve learned over the years that when you let others into your thoughts, they have a great way of poking holes in your ideas, and they add a different perspective to things that I would have never thought of. So, I love true collaboration because when all of those ideas come together, the result is so good, and well thought out from all areas.

I really can’t thank her enough for her mentorship, but those are the two things that I use every day, to help me continue to grow and learn. I feel like I’m a lifelong learner.

Oh my gosh, that is so wonderful. It’s a wonderful tribute to another great leader, and a great person. I really appreciate your thoughtfulness and your reflectiveness.

Every day, we learn something new. These last three months, we’re learning a ton of things about resiliency. What are some career aspirations that you have? You’ve accomplished so much, you incredibly, incredibly influence and impact people, and we’ve got a lot more work for you, so I don’t want you going anywhere too soon. But, what are some other things that are on your mind? What’s going on, as we prepare for the next chapters in Patty’s life?

Oh yeah, I think about that a lot. Like I said, I’m always thinking about things. For me, my education, and where my teaching career is one phase of my life. I don’t know if anybody knows this, but I am in my freshman year of my retirement years, and I’m scheduled to retire in June 2023. I think about my next phase, or my next … Yeah, retirement is my next journey.

I would love to maybe teach college, I’ve thought of teaching special ed classes, it’s just a passion of mine. Maybe work with student teachers, again, really helping these young people prepare for their career, I think I would love to do that. I would also love to speak at conferences on mentoring, or consult districts on mentoring and mentor programs. So, those are some of my aspirations, and things that I’m thinking about in my next phase.

I will do all of this in a warmer environment, I think.

I don’t blame you, and I’ll come see you speak at a conference or two, or send some people. So Patty, we’ve learned so much about you. If you wouldn’t mind, would you reflect a little bit on some of the high points, or some of the proud moments, looking back at your career? We still have a lot more career in you, and I’m looking forward to the next several years we’ve got together. Then, just reflect a little bit, if you don’t mind, highlights of working in North Shore School District 12? That would be wonderful, I’d love to hear some more.

For sure. I think some of my proudest moments are the relationships that I have made, and the connections that I have with so many students. Over 26 years of teaching in Highland Park, and two in Waukegan, I’ve taught many, many kids, and like I said before, they’ve taught me so much, so I love the relationships and the connections I’ve made with them. The parents of our students, too, I think we sometimes forget about how much our parents teach us along the journey as well. Just teachers and administrators, guest teachers and para professionals, you said before I am a people person, and I love having conversations with people, and getting to know them. Their experiences help me grow and learn, so that’s one of my proudest moments is just the relationships that I’ve made.

Then, I think I’m proud of the teacher that I was. I really loved my small group classes because I really had to develop them from scratch, and I loved working with the gen ed teachers, and modifying the gen ed program for the kids in my special ed program because I wanted them to experience the exact same things that our mainstream kids were experiencing. But at a modified level, where they didn’t feel overwhelmed, so I’m proud of what I did there.

Then, most recently I think I’m just really proud of the redesign of the mentor program, and especially the addition of one-to-one job alike mentors. For anybody that doesn’t know, we just had building mentors as our mentor program, so when I came in I got a lot of feedback of, “I love my building mentor, but I really would love to collaborate with somebody that had the same job.” So from there, the job alike mentor was born. I just think the more we can support our new teachers, and help them to reflect and grow to be effective educators, the more our students will grow, so I’m super proud of that as well.

Those are my highlights. Yeah.

Patty, those are impressive, and those are incredible, and those are timeless, and those are long lasting. I know that your students, and your colleagues, and the teachers with whom you co-taught, and the parents are all extremely lucky. And I know that the administrators are, including myself.

As we bring this really incredible interview to a close, do you want to follow up, or finish up with some highlights of working in district 112?

Sure. When I thought about the highlights, things that just popped into my head, first of all, were timestamps. Over the last 30 years, some of the timestamps were the Gulf War, consolidation of districts 107, 108, and 111 to district 112, 911, the reconfiguration of the district, and most recently the Coronavirus. It was weird that when I was reflecting on this, my highlights, that these were all stressful, hard times that popped into my head.

But myself, and the district, really came back from each one of those experiences better and stronger, and I know that through COVID-19 we’re going to do the same.

Absolutely, absolutely. Thank you.

Yeah. Then, just really to wrap up, another highlight, is that I just grew up in this district, under the direction of so many wonderful people, and my highlights are really just my students, the people that I’ve met, the lifelong friends that I have made, and my influence on others. I feel very grateful.

Dr. Schumacher, who’s a very good friend of mine, and another big influencer, met him way back at Northwood, he was my school psychologist and we’re still good friends today, he shared a quote with me the other day that really spoke to me. It said, “The meaning of life is to find your gifts. The purpose of life is to give it away.” I just want to take this opportunity to thank you, and district 112, for giving me the opportunity to find and share my gifts with others. I genuinely care about people, and I want all staff and students to know that they matter, and to be able to find the potential that they have inside. I lead with kindness, and patience, and understanding, and trust, all the things that I’ve learned from other people, in hopes to help others find their gifts so that they can share them, too, so thank you so much.

Patty, it has been an absolute pleasure to interview on Lighthouse 112, I thank you. You’re a gift to the profession, and I’m so happy to share you with the world through this medium. Thank you so much, and I can’t wait until we get back in-person.

Thank you for listening to Lighthouse 112, the podcast from the superintendent of schools in the North Shore School District 112. We’re a PK8 public school district in Northeast Illinois. This podcast is a source for information about the school district, it’s leadership, it’s teachers and students, and it’s community. It’s another source of updates, and an additional source of news regarding the changing narrative of public education. Inspire, innovate, engage.

This podcast can be listened to and heard on Anchor, Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify, Breaker, Overcast, Hubcast, Radio Public, Stitcher, and other sources are being added all the time. Please check back and subscribe to use, to stay current with what’s going on in North Short School District 112. Please also visit our website at www.nssd112.org. Thank you so much for listening and for your interest.

SPANISH

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Este es el Faro 112, el podcast del superintendente de escuelas del Distrito Escolar 112 de North Shore. Somos un distrito escolar público de pre-kinder a octavo grado en el noreste de Illinois. Este podcast es una fuente de información sobre el distrito escolar, su liderazgo, sus maestros, sus estudiantes y su comunidad. Es otra fuente de actualizaciones, y una fuente adicional de noticias sobre la cambiante narrativa de la educación pública. Inspirar, innovar, comprometerse.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Gracias por pasar por el Faro 112. Hoy, estamos entrevistando a Patty Samuelian, mentora de maestra, maestra con asignación especial en el Distrito Escolar 112 de North Shore, miembro del personal desde hace mucho tiempo, y toda una gran persona. Patty, es tan maravilloso tenerte aquí hoy. Hoy vamos a compartir con nuestros oyentes más sobre tu viaje, tu historia, tus aspiraciones profesionales, tus momentos de orgullo y, en realidad, tus pensamientos sobre cualquier cosa de la que te gustaría hablar. Así que es un placer añadirlos a la lista de personas del distrito 112 que aparecen en Lighthouse 112, nuestro podcast. Un día, me encantaría ver a todos aquí.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Entonces, háganos un favor y diga quién es usted, y déjenos comenzar ahora mismo. Gracias, Patty.

Patty Samuelian:
Muy bien. Bueno, muchas gracias por recibirme. Me siento muy honrada de ser parte de su grupo de podcast. Sí, es muy emocionante estar aquí.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Fantástico. Bueno, podemos empezar por el principio. Así que tu historia de liderazgo probablemente comienza con algunos de los primeros influenciadores. ¿Por qué no nos das una pequeña visión del mundo de Patty?

Patty Samuelian:
Por supuesto. Sabes, cuando me pediste que pensara en mi historia de liderazgo, es una pregunta que nunca había tenido antes, así que fue bastante terapéutico de pensar en los últimos 32 años en la educación, en primer lugar. Pero, realmente tengo que ir más atrás, a mi educación, cuando hablo de mi historia de liderazgo, y de las personas que me influenciaron y lo que soy hoy en día.

Patty Samuelian:
Primero, supongo que me regreso con mis padres. Ambos son grandes influencias en mi vida, y obtengo mi integridad de ambos. Realmente pienso en mis emociones y mi empatía, que obtengo de mi madre. Y en mi ética de trabajo incansable, de mi padre. Mi padre era muy trabajador, y nos enseñó, y nos crió con frases como, “Lidera con ejemplo”. “Sé amable y devuelve a los demás”. Y, “haz las cosas bien, o no las hagas en nada”. Realmente trato de hacer esas cosas todos y cada uno de los días de mi vida.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Creo que son grandes homenajes a tu madre y a tu padre, e incluso son grandes gritos a los valores, los valores fundamentales que nos inculcan a una edad temprana, lo cual es maravilloso.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Ahora, ¿alguna vez pensó en un viaje, una carrera o una vocación que no sea la educación? O, ¿siempre supiste que estabas llamado a enseñar?

Patty Samuelian:
Sí, siempre supe que estaba llamada a enseñar. Mi mamá incluso se refiere a cuando yo era una niña pequeña, y yo establecí la escuela en mi sótano, siempre me sentí atraída por los niños, y por ayudarlos. Así que nunca, nunca hubo una pregunta en mi mente acerca de mi enseñanza.

Patty Samuelian:
Fui a una escuela muy pequeña en Dubuque, Iowa, donde obtuve una doble licenciatura en educación especial y educación primaria. Mi primer trabajo de maestra fue en Waukegan, en la Escuela Elemental West en 1988.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Vaya.

Patty Samuelian:
Dos personas allí, que … Sí.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Eso es maravilloso. Ahora, tienes a tu madre y a tu padre, tienes tus influencias creciendo, tienes un increíble conjunto de valores fundamentales. Eliges la universidad de Loras, en Dubuque, Iowa, y te especializas en educación especial y primaria. Diría que ya es bastante impresionante. Te lo agradezco, Patty. De verdad, y te agradezco que nos lleves de vuelta al Distrito Escolar 60 de Waukegan. ¿Hubo alguna gente importante que conociste allí?

Patty Samuelian:
Absolutamente. Sabes, conocí a mucha gente importante. Tus dos primeros años de carrera son los que nunca olvidarás. Pero, dos personas que realmente me destacaron fueron, el número uno, un hombre llamado Robert Abbott. Era el jefe de educación especial en Waukegan, y era un hombre amable y gentil, que tenía mucha pasión y amor por lo que hacía, y por el trabajo que hacía con los niños con necesidades especiales. Sentía su energía positiva cada vez que estaba a su alrededor, y eso me hacía querer ser mejor para mis alumnos.

Patty Samuelian:
Entonces, la segunda persona que realmente me influyó fue mi director en ese momento, que era Neil Codell. Él me enseñó la importancia de tomar tiempo, todos los días, para detenerme y conectarme personalmente con la gente, ser amable, y ser un buen oyente. Lo hizo suyo… Era un hombre muy ocupado, pero cada mañana se detenía, y daba la bienvenida a cada miembro del personal, tanto en West Elementary, y luego más tarde en Highland Park conmigo también.

El Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Neil Codell es una especie de leyenda en el distrito 111 primero, y luego en el 112, ¿verdad? Luego, pasó a ser superintendente en el distrito 219, así que también tuvimos a niños que asistieron a Allen Place, cuando yo trabajaba allí. Así que, no puedo esperar a escuchar más sobre Neil. Y, creo que todos nuestros oyentes van a mirar y averiguar, ¿cómo te fue en la Universidad de Loras, Waukegan, y ahora en Northwood? Cuéntanos un poco sobre cómo pasó eso.

Patty Samuelian:
Absolutamente. Al final de mi segundo año en Waukegan, el Sr. Codell, mi director, vino a mí y me dijo que iba a tomar otro trabajo. Y, por difícil que fuera dejar Waukegan, tenía esta gran oportunidad en Highland Park, y quería que lo acompañara porque tenía una vacante para un profesor de educación especial. Me encantaba su estilo de liderazgo y sabía que podía aprender mucho de él, así que dejé Waukegan y me encontré enseñando en la escuela media, educación especial, en la Escuela Secundaria Northwood en Highland Park, que en ese momento era el distrito 111.

El Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Vaya. Ahora, en primer lugar, no sé cómo alguien que tiene apenas 35 años como usted pudo haber estado en la educación durante 35 años, así que todavía estoy tratando de hacer las matemáticas aquí. Pero, cuéntanos un poco sobre tus experiencias en Northwood… Sé que tus años en Waukegan te influenciaron, y sé que líderes maravillosos te influencian, y creo que es muy bueno que te conozcamos ahora como un líder maravilloso, que está influenciando a tanta gente. Así que te aseguro que los primeros días y las primeras influencias están saliendo a la luz en cómo estás ayudando a tantos de nuestros maestros.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Así que sigue, Patty, cuéntanos algunas de las otras experiencias que has tenido…

Patty Samuelian:
Genial. Bueno, gracias por ese reconocimiento. Pero, tienes razón, hay tanta gente que conoces a lo largo de tu viaje, y especialmente yo, que realmente me influenció.

Patty Samuelian:
Enseñé en Northwood desde 1990 hasta 2014, y prácticamente enseñé los tres niveles de grado, pero en su mayoría me quedé en el sexto grado, que era mi grado favorito. Me encanta esa transición entre el quinto y el sexto grado. Enseñé a los cinco académicos, en una clase autocontenida o en un grupo pequeño, así como en recursos. Incluso llegué a enseñar una sección genérica de sexto grado un año, ahí es donde entra mi pequeña educación genérica, y eso fue muy emocionante. Tenían una clase sobre derrames, y la tomé y me encantó.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Maravilloso.

Patty Samuelian:
Entonces, realmente algunas personas que se destacan para mí como personas que realmente contribuyeron a lo que soy hoy, a lo largo de esos años fueron, número uno, mi mentora Norma Cohen, que fue una maestra de educación especial que me tomó bajo su ala, y me enseñó todo. Pasó horas interminables e incansables mostrándome el camino, y fue amable, paciente y profesional. Es lo que yo necesitaba, como nueva maestra, y yo me modelé con ella todos los días. Sigo hablando con Norma todo el tiempo, es una de mis más queridas amigas. De hecho, sigue trabajando como sustituta en Northwood, lo cual no puedo creer. Es tan dedicada, y me encanta eso de ella.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Es una dama maravillosa, me haré eco de esos sentimientos, por supuesto. Es muy agradable.

Patty Samuelian:
Sí. Entonces, otras personas que realmente tuvieron un papel importante en lo que soy hoy son mis estudiantes. Enseñé a tantos niños, y los niños a los que enseñé lucharon académicamente, y a veces emocionalmente, y realmente dependía de mí como profesora crecer, aprender y entender. Creía en cada uno de ellos, siempre tuve grandes expectativas para ellos. Era honesto, digno de confianza, me importaba conectar con quienes eran como personas. Y, tenía que entender sus necesidades únicas, y averiguar cómo enseñarles. Me ayudaron en ese proceso, y le debo mucho de mi crecimiento a mis estudiantes.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Creo que es hermoso.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Recuerdo que hace años, cuando enseñaba en Elm Place, mi primer año tuve el privilegio de co-enseñar con Jan Copperthorn. Jan era el profesor [crosstalk 00:10:33], yo era el profesor de estudios sociales, y queríamos que todos en la clase supieran que ambos éramos los profesores. Así que describimos nuestros roles, Jan dijo que ella era la experta en enseñanza y aprendizaje, y cómo funcionaba el cerebro. Y yo era la experta en historia y educación cívica. De esa manera, sabíamos quiénes eran todos y cuáles eran las necesidades de cada uno, pero de esa manera nos asociamos y fue nuestra manera de abordarlo. Así que me encanta el hecho de que sus estudiantes hayan jugado un papel tan importante en la formación de quiénes son, porque realmente nos impactan, y realmente saben lo que necesitan. Es muy bueno cuando podemos descubrir eso, también, como sus profesores para ayudar a satisfacer sus necesidades. Me encanta.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Continúa, me encanta tu historia, Patty. Es un material genial. Gracias.

Patty Samuelian:
Claro. Bueno, absolutamente, y como tú, mis compañeros también son grandes influenciadores. Son esos co-profesores, o hay varios profesores y paraprofesionales que he conocido a lo largo de mi viaje, a los que les he robado ideas, y he intentado imitar los rasgos que los hacen especiales.

Patty Samuelian:
Al igual que mis compañeros, mis administradores, creo que tuve múltiples AP y directores, creo que cambiaron casi cada tres o cuatro años cuando estuve en Northwood. Pero, cuando conoces a gente en el camino, te aferras a todas esas cosas positivas que tienen. Para aquellos realmente fuertes, me ayudaron a ver el valor de ser organizado, de ser un buen comunicador, de ser amable y de tener responsabilidad, y realmente esa pasión y esa clara visión a lo largo del camino. Estuve allí mucho tiempo, y tuve algunas grandes, grandes personas de las que aprendí.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Bueno, eres una persona muy sociable, y no puedo esperar hasta que volvamos a trabajar, en persona, para poder verte todos los días. Es muy difícil estar alejado por tanto tiempo, sé que nos está afectando a todos. Pero creo que es maravilloso que compartas no sólo el viaje de un maestro, la profundidad de un maestro, sino el corazón de un maestro. Porque no sólo celebramos el trabajo, y celebramos la carrera, y celebramos la profesión, todo eso es maravilloso, pero también celebramos nuestras vidas.

El Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
¿Nos haría un favor y nos llevaría a través de un poco de los hitos de su vida que también tuvieron lugar durante el casi cuarto de siglo, cuando tuvo su primera fase en el distrito 112, en Northwood?

Patty Samuelian:
Por supuesto. Bueno, en mis dos primeros años en Waukegan, conocí a mi marido, que era profesor allí. Así que, eso fue un poco difícil porque me estaba yendo, y lo dejé atrás. Pero más tarde, nos casamos.

Patty Samuelian:
Durante el tiempo que pasé en Northwood, obtuve mi maestría en educación especial, tomé un montón de 45 horas crédito adicionales de trabajo de postgrado. Tenía dos hijos, y estaba involucrada en muchas cosas en Northwood. Me tomé muy en serio el formar parte de la escuela, y era muy apasionado y amaba mi escuela. Quiero decir, crecí allí, y me encantó cada minuto de ella.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
En una reciente entrevista en un podcast, el director Sergio González dijo que aprendió muy rápido, en su primer año como director, que una vez que eres un Husky, siempre eres un Husky. Dijo que aprendió eso más o menos en sus primeras semanas de trabajo en Northwood.

Patty Samuelian:
Absolutamente, es un grupo de personas muy, muy especial. Ya sabes, cuando conozco a todo el personal, y todos los diferentes edificios, hay gente especial en todas partes. Pero, siempre tendrá un lugar especial en mi corazón, de un lugar que crecí y aprendí mucho allí.

Patty Samuelian:
Había dicho que había estado involucrada en muchas cosas en Northwood, pero creo que las dos cosas principales en las que estaba involucrada, que llevaron mi historia de liderazgo a una dirección completamente nueva, era ser una mentora y una líder de equipo. Mucha gente cree que tengo un respaldo administrativo, pero no es así. Nunca tuve el objetivo de ser administradora, pero realmente me encantaron los roles de liderazgo de los maestros, como el de mentora, y el de líder de equipo. Cuando el maestro en misión especial fue publicado en 2014, me hablaba en voz alta, así que solicité el puesto y, por suerte, lo obtuve.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Me alegro de que lo hicieras. Y realmente aprecio que señale que no necesita ser un administrador con licencia con su tipo 75, o lo que sea hoy en día, es un líder. Eres un influyente de la gente, eres un educador, eres un profesor, tus acciones son lo que más importa. Como otros te han ayudado, y guiado, y entrenado, encuentro tan impresionante y tan afirmante, Patty, es que lo pagas literalmente, figurativamente, y cada día estoy agradecido de que tengamos a este profesor en una posición de asignación especial. Y creo que es maravilloso que seas un líder, pero no eres un administrador, y te liberas de tener algunas de las cargas que se imponen a las personas con ese título, o con esa licencia.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Eres libre, tienes tanta propiedad del programa de mentores, tienes tanta propiedad de los profesores que empiezan, y lo averiguan, y encuentran sus caminos. Y usted es sólo un confidente de confianza, y realmente un activo increíble para nuestro distrito. Creo que algunas personas podrían decir: “Está bien, lo entiendo”. Pero, ¿podemos hablar un poco más específicamente, como qué hace un maestro en una tarea especial? ¿Y cuáles son algunos de los detalles que hace? Creo que algunas personas van a encontrar esto fascinante.

Patty Samuelian:
Absolutamente. Bueno, realmente me colocaron en una posición única porque antes no había ninguna posición. Así que estaba nerviosa, pero estaba aún más emocionada por desarrollar este papel con el que había soñado. Quiero decir, realmente cuando hablas de mí con esas cualidades agradables, es muy fácil para mí, y siento que es una posición muy natural para mí estar en, sólo para ayudar a los demás. Me hace sentir muy bien, por eso me entusiasmé con la oportunidad de solicitar este puesto.

Patty Samuelian:
En realidad, el puesto tiene cuatro partes principales, y todas ellas están ayudando en la realidad. La primera parte principal es el coordinador del programa de mentores del distrito 112. En el papel de coordinador del programa de mentores, creo y organizo el programa, y todos los materiales y entrenamientos necesarios. Coloco a todos los nuevos miembros del personal con mentores, superviso y entreno a todos los mentores. Actúo como un mentor secundario para todo nuestro personal de educación especial, porque tienen un papel bastante único donde son administradores de casos y maestros, así que realmente ayudo con el papel de administrador de casos de eso. Luego, superviso a todo el personal nuevo, en general, colaborando con los mentores regularmente. Así que esa es una parte del trabajo, y ese es el sombrero más grande que uso.

Patty Samuelian:
Entonces, tengo otros tres pequeños sombreros también. Soy coordinadora de maestros invitados, donde entreno y entrevisto a todos nuestros maravillosos maestros invitados, y me comunico con ellos regularmente a través de boletines, y correos electrónicos, y cosas así. Otro de los sombreros que uso es el de coordinador de estudiantes y profesores, así que trabajo con las universidades, las universidades locales, para ayudar a colocar a los estudiantes y profesores. Lo cual me encanta, porque siento que en cualquier momento podemos devolver a los nuevos educadores, y ayudar a entrenarlos y moldearlos, será simplemente genial para nuestra organización y los estudiantes. Entonces, mi último sombrero que llevo es que me llamo a mí mismo un enlace de licencia, y básicamente trato de entender todos los cambios que están ocurriendo en la ISBE, sus procedimientos y proceso de renovación, y el desarrollo profesional. Y trabajo para ayudar a nuestro personal a mantenerse al día con todos esos cambios, y asegurarme de que sus renovaciones se lleven a cabo sin problemas.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Vaya.

Patty Samuelian:
Eso es, en pocas palabras.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Esos son unos sombreros increíbles, y aprecio su nave de enlace de licencia, porque me recordó gentilmente que necesitaba renovar mi licencia, lo cual hice, todo está bien.

Patty Samuelian:
Bien.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Nuestros profesores tienen suerte de tenerte, nuestros administradores tienen suerte de tenerte. Creo que otras personas que están escuchando hoy van a decir, “Espera un minuto. ¿Cómo diablos haces todo eso?” Es porque tenemos a Patty. Patty fue desarrollada por grandes líderes, es una gran líder, claramente tiene grandes padres que la apoyaron. Estoy seguro de que Jack y Gina también se están beneficiando de su liderazgo.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Ahora mismo, está oficialmente alojado fuera de la oficina de personal, o de la oficina del Superintendente Adjunto Schrader. Háblenos un poco sobre la Dra. Schroeder y sus influencias en usted, por favor.

Patty Samuelian:
Absolutamente, ella ha sido una gran parte de mi historia de liderazgo. Porque algunas personas pueden no saberlo, pero ella fue mi última directora en Northwood, y ahora mi jefa. Ella realmente confió en mí para tomar este nuevo puesto y seguir adelante con él. Conocía mi estilo porque fue mi directora durante muchos años, y sabe que mi mente está constantemente corriendo con todas las nuevas ideas, y cómo mejorar las cosas. Así que dijo: “Aquí están las responsabilidades”, y realmente confió en mí para desarrollar el programa, y ha estado a mi lado todo el tiempo.

Patty Samuelian:
Ella me ha ayudado a aprender mucho, y ha sido una increíble mentora para mí. Pero creo que las dos cosas que realmente destacan para mí, que uso todos los días de mi vida, es que, en primer lugar, siempre me alentó a mí y a todos los demás miembros del personal a acudir a ella con cualquier problema. Ella decía, “Puedes venir a mí con un problema, pero también venir a mí con posibles soluciones.” Ese consejo de liderazgo realmente me empuja todos los días, a pensar siempre más allá del problema y ser creativo, porque siempre hay una manera de resolverlo. Aunque a veces tenemos algunas restricciones, podemos resolver cualquier cosa si somos creativos.

Patty Samuelian:
Entonces, en segundo lugar, ella siempre me anima a pasar mis ideas a otros colegas, y realmente colaborar. Esto me parece invaluable, ya que he aprendido a lo largo de los años que cuando dejas que otros entren en tus pensamientos, tienen una gran manera de hacer agujeros en tus ideas, y añaden una perspectiva diferente a cosas en las que yo nunca habría pensado. Así que me encanta la verdadera colaboración porque cuando todas esas ideas se juntan, el resultado es tan bueno, y bien pensado en todas las áreas.

Patty Samuelian:
Realmente no puedo agradecerle lo suficiente por su tutoría, pero esas son las dos cosas que uso todos los días, para ayudarme a seguir creciendo y aprendiendo. Siento que soy una aprendiz de por vida.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Oh, Dios mío, eso es tan maravilloso. Es un maravilloso tributo a otro gran líder y a una gran persona. Realmente aprecio su consideración y su reflexión.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Cada día, aprendemos algo nuevo. Estos últimos tres meses, estamos aprendiendo un montón de cosas sobre la resistencia. ¿Cuáles son algunas de las aspiraciones profesionales que tienes? Ha logrado tanto, que influye e impacta increíblemente en la gente, y tenemos mucho más trabajo para usted, así que no quiero que se vaya a ninguna parte demasiado pronto. Pero, ¿qué otras cosas tienes en mente? ¿Qué está pasando, mientras nos preparamos para los próximos capítulos de la vida de Patty?

Patty Samuelian:
Oh sí, pienso mucho en eso. Como dije, siempre estoy pensando en cosas. Para mí, mi educación, y donde mi carrera como profesora es una fase de mi vida. No sé si alguien sabe esto, pero estoy en el primer año de mis años de retiro, y estoy programada para retirarme en junio de 2023. Pienso en mi próxima fase, o en mi próxima… Sí, el retiro es mi próximo viaje.

Patty Samuelian:
Me encantaría tal vez enseñar en la universidad, he pensado en enseñar clases de educación especial, es sólo una pasión mía. Tal vez trabajar con estudiantes de magisterio, de nuevo, realmente ayudar a estos jóvenes a prepararse para su carrera, creo que me encantaría hacer eso. También me encantaría hablar en conferencias sobre mentores, o consultar a los distritos sobre programas de mentores y mentoras. Así que, esas son algunas de mis aspiraciones, y cosas en las que estoy pensando en mi próxima fase.

Patty Samuelian:
Voy a hacer todo esto en un ambiente más cálido, creo.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
No te culpo, e iré a verte hablar en una o dos conferencias, o a enviar a algunas personas. Así que Patty, hemos aprendido mucho sobre ti. Si no te importa, ¿reflexionarías un poco sobre algunos de los puntos culminantes, o algunos de los momentos de orgullo, mirando hacia atrás en tu carrera? Todavía tenemos mucha más carrera en ti, y estoy deseando que pasen los próximos años que estemos juntos. Entonces, reflexiona un poco, si no te importa, ¿los puntos más destacados de trabajar en el Distrito Escolar 12 de North Shore? Eso sería maravilloso, me encantaría escuchar algo más.

Patty Samuelian:
Por supuesto. Creo que algunos de mis momentos de mayor orgullo son las relaciones que he hecho, y las conexiones que tengo con tantos estudiantes. Durante 26 años de enseñanza en Highland Park, y dos en Waukegan, he enseñado a muchos, muchos niños, y como dije antes, me han enseñado mucho, así que me encantan las relaciones y las conexiones que he hecho con ellos. Los padres de nuestros estudiantes, también, creo que a veces olvidamos lo mucho que nuestros padres nos enseñan a lo largo del viaje también. Sólo profesores y administradores, profesores invitados y paraprofesionales, dijiste antes que soy una persona de personas, y me encanta tener conversaciones con la gente, y llegar a conocerlos. Sus experiencias me ayudan a crecer y aprender, así que uno de mis momentos de mayor orgullo son las relaciones que he hecho.

Patty Samuelian:
Entonces, creo que estoy orgullosa de la maestra que fui. Me encantaban mis clases en grupos pequeños porque tenía que desarrollarlas desde cero, y me encantaba trabajar con los maestros de educación general y modificar el programa de educación general para los niños en mi programa de educación especial porque quería que experimentaran exactamente las mismas cosas que nuestros niños normales estaban experimentando. Pero a un nivel modificado, donde no se sintieran abrumados, así que estoy orgulloso de lo que hice allí.

Patty Samuelian:
Entonces, más recientemente creo que estoy muy orgullosa del rediseño del programa de mentores, y especialmente de la adición de mentores de trabajo individualizado. Para los que no lo sepan, teníamos mentores de construcción como nuestro programa de mentores, así que cuando llegué recibí muchos comentarios de: “Me encanta mi mentor de construcción, pero me encantaría colaborar con alguien que tuviera el mismo trabajo”. Así que de ahí, nació el trabajo de mentor igual que el trabajo. Creo que cuanto más podamos apoyar a nuestros nuevos maestros, y ayudarlos a reflexionar y crecer para ser educadores efectivos, más nuestros estudiantes crecerán, así que estoy súper orgulloso de eso también.

Patty Samuelian:
Esos son mis mejores momentos. Sí.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Patty, esos son impresionantes, y esos son increíbles, y esos son atemporales, y esos son de larga duración. Sé que tus estudiantes, y tus colegas, y los profesores con los que has colaborado, y los padres son todos muy afortunados. Y sé que los administradores, incluido yo mismo.

El Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Mientras terminamos esta increíble entrevista, ¿quieren hacer un seguimiento o terminar con algunos aspectos destacados del trabajo en el distrito 112?

Patty Samuelian:
Claro. Cuando pensé en los puntos más destacados, lo primero que me vino a la cabeza fueron las marcas de tiempo. En los últimos 30 años, algunas de las marcas de tiempo fueron la Guerra del Golfo, la consolidación de los distritos 107, 108 y 111 en el distrito 112, 911, la reconfiguración del distrito, y más recientemente el Coronavirus. Fue raro que cuando reflexionaba sobre esto, mis puntos más destacados, que todos estos fueron tiempos estresantes y difíciles que se me vinieron a la cabeza.

Patty Samuelian:
Pero yo, y el distrito, realmente regresé de cada una de esas experiencias mejor y más fuerte, y sé que a través de COVID-19 vamos a hacer lo mismo.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Absolutamente, absolutamente. Gracias.

Patty Samuelian:
Sí. Entonces, para terminar, otro punto culminante, es que crecí en este distrito, bajo la dirección de tanta gente maravillosa, y mis puntos culminantes son mis estudiantes, la gente que he conocido, los amigos de toda la vida que he hecho, y mi influencia en los demás. Me siento muy agradecido.

Patty Samuelian:
El Dr. Schumacher, que es un muy buen amigo mío, y otro gran influyente, lo conoció hace mucho tiempo en Northwood, fue mi psicólogo escolar y aún hoy somos buenos amigos, compartió conmigo una cita el otro día que realmente me habló. Decía, “El significado de la vida es encontrar tus dones. El propósito de la vida es regalarlo”. Quiero aprovechar esta oportunidad para agradecerle a usted y al distrito 112 por darme la oportunidad de encontrar y compartir mis dones con otros. Realmente me importa la gente, y quiero que todo el personal y los estudiantes sepan que son importantes, y que puedan encontrar el potencial que tienen dentro. Dirijo con amabilidad, y paciencia, y comprensión, y confianza, todas las cosas que he aprendido de otras personas, con la esperanza de ayudar a otros a encontrar sus dones para que ellos también puedan compartirlos, así que muchas gracias.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Patty, ha sido un absoluto placer entrevistarte en Lighthouse 112, te lo agradezco. Eres un regalo para la profesión, y estoy muy feliz de compartirte con el mundo a través de este medio. Muchas gracias, y no puedo esperar hasta que volvamos en persona.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Gracias por escuchar el Faro 112, el podcast del superintendente de escuelas del Distrito Escolar 112 de North Shore. Somos un distrito escolar público PK8 en el noreste de Illinois. Este podcast es una fuente de información sobre el distrito escolar, su liderazgo, sus profesores y estudiantes, y su comunidad. Es otra fuente de actualizaciones, y una fuente adicional de noticias sobre la cambiante narrativa de la educación pública. Inspirar, innovar, comprometerse.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Este podcast puede ser escuchado y oído en Anchor, Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify, Breaker, Overcast, Hubcast, Radio Public, Stitcher, y otras fuentes se están añadiendo todo el tiempo. Por favor, vuelve a revisar y suscríbete para estar al día con lo que pasa en el Distrito Escolar 112 de North Shore. Por favor, también visite nuestro sitio web en www.nssd112.org. Muchas gracias por escuchar y por su interés.

Skip to toolbar