July 26 Podcast Update on Reopening Plans in D112 (English Audio, English & Spanish Transcript)

As we prepare to reopen schools during a global pandemic, Dr. Lubelfeld shares an update and some clarifying points about the plan, as well as the next steps. In North Shore School District 112 there is a planned HYBRID learning model which calls for five days a week, two-plus hours in person for half student population in the morning or the afternoon as part of a five-hour instructional day. There is limited child care offered by the district as well as the constant health metric reviews. For more information and up to date changes, visit: https://www.nssd112.org/domain/1243

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
This is Lighthouse 112, the podcast from the superintendent of schools in North Shore School District 112. We’re a pre-K through 8 public school district in Northeast Illinois. This podcast is a source of information about the school district, its leadership, its teachers, its students, and its community. It’s another source of updates and an additional source of news regarding the changing narrative of public innovation. Inspire. Innovate. Engage.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
In this episode, we’re going to talk about the reopening plans, some of the facts, some of the details, some of the controversy, some of the difficulties, and some of the challenges. North Shore School District 112 is dedicated to ensuring our students and staff return safely in-person to school for the ’20, ’21 school year to the degree possible and practical in light of the Illinois Department of Public Health guidelines and the regulations.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
In-person learning at the start of the school year will look different than what we’re used to as we’re currently recommending what’s called a hybrid learning model consisting of two shifts of students, morning and afternoon, to allow us to implement risk mitigation of COVID-19 with smaller populations of students in school at any one time. We’ll focus on providing an environment that is caring, supportive, and compassionate with the understanding that the health and wellbeing of our students, staff, and community is our highest priority.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
By splitting the children into no more than half of the population at any one given time, we’re guaranteed that our teachers and our support staff can have in-person classes that are half or less their usual size to allow for social distancing, physical distancing, and the effective use of PPE, personal protective equipment. We don’t want anyone in harm’s way. We don’t want our staff in harm’s way. We don’t want our students in harm’s way, yet we absolutely are committed to the fact that our students who’ve been out of school in-person since mark desperately need their routine for their social, emotional, and mental health, and for their academic growth, we’re focusing on basic skills, literacy and numeracy, reading, writing, and arithmetic in-person.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Our learning model though is not limited to two hours. It’s a five-hour learning model. All of our teachers are working very hard, way harder than ever before because this is completely different than what we’re used to. The students would be in school for just over two hours. Then there’ll be learning at home, sometimes live and sometimes what we call asynchronous or like doing homework that was directly assigned by their teachers for the other three hours.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
This learning model is going to take place if it’s safe to bring people back in person, and we’re looking at county health metrics, state health metrics. We also have surveys out of our parents to find out which model they prefer, the in-person portion of hybrid or the virtual. Right now, it’s around 85% of the parents are sending their children in-person if we open in-person, and we’re also surveying our staff to find out comfort levels with the information that we’ve provided, and we’ll be sharing that information on Tuesday night, July 28th.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
In this episode, I’m going to talk specifically about some elements of the plan that have been confusing or misunderstood or needs some clarification based on questions we received. Thank you for tuning in. I will be right back with some clarifying questions.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
First of all, how are we going to determine whether or not it’s even safe to open during this public health crisis, during this pandemic? Well, I look at the Illinois Department of Public Health website. They have COVID-19 metrics, regional metrics, and we’re looking to make sure that the virus does not have a community spread resurgence here in Lake County where we are located. If you look at Region IX, which is Lake County and McHenry County, and over the past six days… Now, I’m recording this podcast on Sunday, July 26 just to let you know. Over the last six days, there’s been a slight increase in positivity rates of testing for COVID019. This is one of the many metrics that we’re reviewing on a daily or even sometimes three or four times a day basis.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
As of July 22, 2020, which is what they’re posting on their website right now, Lake County and McHenry County, Region IX of Illinois, have a positivity rate of 4.3%. If that hits a threshold of 8%, I will not reopen the school. We will go to full remote learning. 8% is simply a threshold that’s a metric, yet I’ve been meeting with officials with the Lake County Department of Public Health, and if the positivity test rate went to 8%, that could indicate community spread, and that could indicate conditions where unfavorable to opening in person. There’s no absolutes here, yet I’m giving you guidance on this. Right now, we’re at 4.3%. Right now, the positivity rolling seven-day average indicates that community spread is not such that it will prohibit me from asking people to come in in-person. Again, that’s one way to look at it.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
We also look at the bed availability in the intensive care unit, and we look at other metrics that are coming out from Lake County Department of Public Health and Illinois Department of Public Health. A key here is we want students back in school, yet we want to do it in a safe and responsible manner.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Educationally speaking, our children need to be in school. Educationally speaking, we need to focus on reading, writing, arthritic in-person, and then social studies, science, the creative arts, and all of the other incredible school experiences live via web or what we call asynchronous. We’re looking at a five-hour-a-day school experience, which is significantly different than what we did last spring.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
These are metrics. We’re looking at the health departments. We want to see if it’s safe. In the next segment of today’s episode of Lighthouse 112, we’re going to talk about some of the conflicts surrounding reopening planning that doesn’t involve full-day reopening. Stay tuned.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
One of the greatest dilemmas of a public school system is how to care for children during the day when there’s a public health crisis that’s interrupting the normal way of doing business and helping families and the economy function and grapple with challenges, changes, and dilemmas. If you look at the District 112 hybrid model hours, in kindergarten through fifth grade, we’re looking at an 8:40 to 10:55 a.m. session, morning session. On our before-care childcare programming with Innovation Learning, parents can drop their children off at 6:30, and they can be at school until 10:55, so we’re offering a childcare type option of a little over four hours, 6:30 in the morning until just before 11:00, or if they took the bus to get home, 11:30. It could be said 6:30 to 11:30, five hours of care. If the children are in the p.m. session from 12:55 to 3:10, we’re also allowing for aftercare childcare until 6:00 p.m. Let’s say the child’s picked up on the bus at 12:30. You’ve got about 5, 5.5 hours of care.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
In District 112, while we’re offering five hours of instruction, we’re also offering a couple of hours of before-care if you’re in the a.m. session, aftercare if you’re in the p.m. session. We also want to emphasize, like I did in the last segment, that the learning is not restricted to the in-person. The teachers are working very hard to provide both synchronous or live instruction, social studies and science, for example, or asynchronous, could be social studies and science, mixture of live and non-live, and also English and math. My point being here is with respect to childcare, we are offering far more than the two hours of in-person for our families.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Now, if we take a look at some of the concerns or complaints or controversy that some folks in the community have been sharing with respect to the issue of childcare, folks are worried that this is simply not enough and that the public school district needs to provide care full-time for while folks are working. It also affects our own employees, our own teachers and support staff.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
We acknowledge and affirm the impact that COVID-19, the global pandemic has on economy, has had on childcare, has had on working families. In our model for coming back to school, these hours will allow for some degree of are, and it’s the most that we’re able to do safely. We cannot increase the pods or cohorts or collections of children during Illinois Restore Illinois Phase 4, no more than 50, first and foremost. We also cannot provide the type of childcare sought. We appeal to the community. We appeal to the greater societal good to work on that. We make no apologies about it. The public school system is going to provide an exceptional public school education.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
We do realize though, and I take a great pause, what are we going to do for our teachers who live in different communities whose school districts may offer no childcare, and nothing, and then what are they supposed to do? This is a dilemma for which we do not have a good answer right now, and we understand it. We’re certainly not tone-deaf to it. We absolutely care, and we’re compassionate about it. This is one of many challenges to attempting to run schools in-person.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Again, the main point of this segment is to show and clarify the hours of District 112’s hybrid model with the fact that we do have before-care and aftercare options available to a degree. Certainly not perfect. Nothing’s perfect, but this has been a huge recent issue. It’s like how do we grapple with it, and we’re not sure yet. We just don’t know yet. In the next segment, we’re going to talk a little bit more about some of the elements of the hybrid model and why we’re doing five-day-week half-day and not A/B as some other places are doing, so stay tuned.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
A question that I’ve been hearing a lot… It’s, really, again, all these questions are excellent questions. None of us have ever had to go through this, but a question I’ve been hearing a lot is why are you doing five days a week half-day with children in-person for just over two hours as opposed to running what other organizations are calling an A/B model, maybe having two full days with half the kids and then three off days? Why are we choosing ours?

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Well, based upon our planning process, which had more than 50 members of the community, parents, board members, teachers, support staff members, administrators, expects from Harvard, as well as our expertise in our leadership team, in our cabinet about what’s best for students, our students have lacked consistency, predictability, and routine since March 12. We believe five days a week, reading, writing, and arithmetic consistently focused in-person with five days a week, some live, some non-live, social studies, science, the arts, and everything in a five-day day with the combination of in-person and at-home is right, is the best model for our school district.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Now, in addition, based in our facilities, aging, old, really in rough shape, not a new thing, and if you know District 112, this has been a decade’s battle, or three decades, almost a third of a century battle. We cannot physically distance. We cannot safely per the IDPH and ISBE regulations, we cannot run the health and risk mitigation that we believe is required to provide for the safety of our staff and the safety of our students. We cannot do that if children are in school all day.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
We have analyzed this. We have studied this. We’ve reviewed this. Our current model gets children in small groups. The children are in small cohorts. They leave. We have a rigorous and hospital-grade cleaning process. Another group of children come in. They leave. We have another rigorous hospital-grade cleaning process, and we repeat this.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
We do not want children congregating in groups larger than their classes of 10-15, maybe 20 in middle school in a larger area. We do not want to have to worry about food and eating on campus. We do not want that. We do not want large congregations of children, so we’re not doing the whole-day model. We know this is a negative impact on childcare needs for families. We understand that, potential negative impact.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Our focus, our thrust, our prioritization, and our trade-offs are the learning, the teaching, the health, safety, wellness of our children and our staff, and that’s why we’re not going to do any other configuration if we’re able to bring children in person, which we hope to. Again, we’re up against a virus, but that’s the reason why. We’ve studied it. It does not work for our schools. It does not work for our ability to risk-mitigate and keep our staff safe, which is of the utmost importance. In the next segment, we’re going to talk about a couple of what-ifs. Stay tuned.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
All right, I’m going to call this segment the depressing and frightening segment. What if we actually are able to open in-person and the community spread is low and things go well? That’ll be amazing. This segment is not about that. This segment is about what if a child test positive for COVID-19? What if a staff member test positive for COVID-19? What if we have bus drivers who can’t show up for work? What if we have Innovation Learning before-care people who are testing positive for COVID?

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
The truth here is if we’re able to open in-person, our hybrid model, everything works and everyone stays health, it’ll be phenomenal, it’ll be incredible. Frighteningly and scarily and depressingly, this virus is vicious, and it’s likely that we will, despite our best health mitigation efforts, despite our best risk mitigation efforts, despite all of our best efforts, we will be impacted by COVID-19.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
The depressing part of this episode is that at any time during the in-person model, if we’re able to open in-person, we are prepared to pivot back to a remote learning model. I just want people to understand that. The reason this is so complicated and a little frustrating for some and a bit overwhelming for all of us is because, A, it’s never been doing before this way, B, it’s a lot of unknowns and we don’t have a control, and as a society, we desperately grasp control and we like control, and there’s “what if this, what if that, what if this, what if that?” What I will say is we are working literally directly with the Lake County Health Department, officials from the Illinois Department of Public Health and in our local areas in NorthShore University Hospital System on these very questions. It is July 26. I do not have all the answers. We may open schools on September 3rd in-person. We may open schools on September 3rd fully remote.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
People have asked about testing. We are investigating the possibility of getting fast-acting accurate tests in our area. I can’t guarantee anything, but we’re looking into that. We’re also trying to get very explicit and clear in easy-to-understand flow charts. If a child has this, what do we do? If a classroom has this, what do we do? The depressing part of this segment is there’s so many unknowns, but I will tell you, we need to seek the expertise of the experts in this area. I know you’re probably thinking, “Well, that was a nothing burger,” and I apologize, but there’s a lot unknown. Next segment is the final segment of this brief episode, and I’m going to tell you what are the next steps.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
What’s going to happen next? Today is July 26. A little quick recap. In June, we formed our stakeholder committee and our planning process. We’ve held a number of meetings. We’ll continue to meet. I addressed the board formally on June 9th. I addressed the board formally on June 30th. All of our materials are on our website, www.nssd112.org. We have a COVID-19 page. We have a “staying healthy in 112” page. We have a board of education page. Everything is there.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
We met with the board on July 21st. We have collected more than 1,500 questions and comments via some frequently asked question generation documents. We’ve released Frequently Asked Questions 1.0. We’re working on 2.0, which will be released within a week. We have received a number of requests for clarification. We held one-hour webinars, seven of them with our staff members last week, seven hours of internal town halls to ask questions and talk and listen. We had a Student Voice Town Hall Webinar prior to that. Tomorrow night, July 27th, there will be a Spanish-speaking presentation for Spanish-speaking families of 1,000 of our 4,000 students in that category, so we’re going to be speaking in Spanish directly to our Spanish-speaking families and answer their questions.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
On Tuesday, July 28th, we have three meetings in one. 6:00, we have a special meeting to do some personnel matters, at 6:15, we have a facility community meeting that’s going to talk about air quality specifically with represent to this particular plan for reopening about which I’ve been discussing this morning in this episode, as well as some of the challenges we face in our district and aging facilities. We’re also going to have at least a one, maybe two-hour discussion on the reopening.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
I’m going to share updates on the staff survey with respect to comfort levels of our staff of returning to work under the conditions that we’ve set forth and that we’ve highlighted today in Lighthouse 112. We’re also going to give an update to the community on the parent surveys opting in for the hybrid in-person model or opt-in out through the hybrid virtual model as I mentioned earlier in this episode. It’s about 85% of the parents, K-8, appear to be opting in for in-person. Obviously, we’ll look at that data and get you updates on Tuesday night.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Then what happens? We continue to plan. We work on logistics and scheduling. We form up contracts for cleaning, for transportation, for curricular materials. We continue training our teachers and support staff. We continue listening to folks. We revise our FAQs to keep up with the 1,500 entries that we have, and we wait and we watch. We watch what happens in other neighboring school districts who’ve either opted for hybrid or all-remote. We watch the Lake County Department of Public Health metrics, the Illinois Department of Public Health Metrics when we get closer to September 3rd. The next board meeting will be August 18th unless the board directs me to have a meeting sooner.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Folks, we are all in this today. We all are affected by this together. We love our children. We love our staff. We need to work together to find out intelligent, thoughtful, and risk-mitigation strategy to actually provide education under these unprecedented times of a global pandemic. We appreciate all of you reaching out. We appreciate you listening. We also appreciate some patient and grace as we try to get through this together. Our start date is currently September 3rd. We’ll see where we go. We’ll keep you posted. Stay tuned. Remember, in District 112, we inspire, we innovate, and we engage.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Thank you for listening to Lighthouse 112, the podcast from the superintendent of schools in the North Shore School District 112. We’re a PK-8 public school district in Northeast Illinois. This podcast is a source of information about the school district, its leadership, its teachers and students, and its community. It’s another source of updates and an additional source of news regarding the changing narrative of public education. Inspire. Innovate. Engage.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
This podcast can be listened to and heard on Anchor, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Breaker, Overcast, PocketCast, RadioPublic, Stitcher, and other sources are being added all the time. Please check back and subscribe to us to stay current with what’s going on in North Shore School District 112. Please also visit our website, www.nssd112.org. Thank you so much for listening and for your interest.

Spanish

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Este es Lighthouse 112, el podcast del superintendente de escuelas del Distrito Escolar 112 de North Shore. Somos un distrito escolar público de pre-kinder- octavo grado en el noreste de Illinois. Este podcast es una fuente de información sobre el distrito escolar, su liderazgo, sus maestros, sus estudiantes y su comunidad. Es otra fuente de actualizaciones y una fuente adicional de noticias sobre la narrativa cambiante de la innovación pública. Inspirar. Innovar. Contratar.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
En este episodio, vamos a hablar sobre los planes de reapertura, algunos de los hechos, algunos de los detalles, algunas de las controversias, algunas de las dificultades y algunos de los desafíos. El Distrito Escolar 112 de North Shore está dedicado a garantizar que nuestros estudiantes y el personal regresen de manera segura en persona a la escuela durante el año escolar ’20, ’21 en la medida de lo posible y práctico a la luz de las pautas y regulaciones del Departamento de Salud Pública de Illinois.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
El aprendizaje en persona al comienzo del año escolar será diferente de lo que estamos acostumbrados, ya que actualmente estamos recomendando lo que se llama un modelo de aprendizaje híbrido que consta de dos turnos de estudiantes, mañana y tarde, para nos permite implementar la mitigación de riesgos de COVID-19 con poblaciones más pequeñas de estudiantes en la escuela en cualquier momento. Nos enfocaremos en proporcionar un entorno que sea afectuoso, solidario y compasivo con la comprensión de que la salud y el bienestar de nuestros estudiantes, el personal y la comunidad es nuestra máxima prioridad.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Al dividir a los niños en no más de la mitad de la población en un momento dado, tenemos la garantía de que nuestros maestros y nuestro personal de apoyo pueden tener clases presenciales de la mitad o menos de su tamaño habitual para permitir para el distanciamiento social, el distanciamiento físico y el uso efectivo de PPE, equipo de protección personal. No queremos poner a nadie en peligro. No queremos que nuestro personal esté en peligro. No queremos que nuestros estudiantes estén en peligro, pero estamos absolutamente comprometidos con el hecho de que nuestros estudiantes que han estado fuera de la escuela en persona desde Marzo necesitan desesperadamente su rutina para su salud social, emocional y mental, y para su crecimiento académico, nos estamos enfocando en habilidades básicas, alfabetización y aritmética, lectura, escritura y aritmética en persona.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Nuestro modelo de aprendizaje, sin embargo, no se limita a dos horas. Es un modelo de aprendizaje de cinco horas. Todos nuestros maestros están trabajando muy duro, mucho más duro que nunca antes porque esto es completamente diferente de lo que estamos acostumbrados. Los estudiantes estarían en la escuela por poco más de dos horas. Luego habrá aprendizaje en casa, a veces en vivo y a veces lo que llamamos asincrónico o hacer la tarea que fueron asignados directamente por sus maestros durante las otras tres horas.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Este modelo de aprendizaje se llevará a cabo si es seguro traer a las personas de vuelta en persona, y estamos analizando las métricas de salud del condado, las métricas de salud estatales. También tenemos encuestas de nuestros padres para averiguar qué modelo prefieren, la porción en persona del híbrido o el virtual. En este momento, alrededor del 85% de los padres están enviando a sus hijos en persona si abrimos en persona, y también estamos encuestando a nuestro personal para averiguar los niveles de comodidad con la información que hemos proporcionado, y lo compartirémos esa información el martes 28 de julio por la noche.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
En este episodio, voy a hablar específicamente sobre algunos elementos del plan que han sido confusos o mal entendidos o necesitan alguna aclaración basada en las preguntas que recibimos. Gracias por sintonizar. Volveré con algunas preguntas aclaratorias.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
En primer lugar, ¿cómo vamos a determinar si es seguro abrir o no durante esta crisis de salud pública, durante esta pandemia? Bueno, miro el sitio web del Departamento de Salud Pública de Illinois. Tienen métricas COVID-19, métricas regionales, y estamos buscando asegurarnos de que el virus no tenga un resurgimiento de propagación comunitaria aquí en el condado de Lake donde estamos ubicados. Si nos fijamos en la Región IX, que es el condado de Lake y el condado de McHenry, y en los últimos seis días … Ahora, estoy grabando este podcast el domingo 26 de julio para informarles. En los últimos seis días, ha habido un ligero aumento de positividad de las pruebas para COVID19. Esta es una de las muchas métricas que estamos revisando diariamente o incluso a veces tres o cuatro veces al día.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
A partir del 22 de julio de 2020, que es lo que están publicando en su sitio web en este momento, el condado de Lake y el condado de McHenry, IX Región de Illinois, tienen una tasa de positividad del 4,3%. Si eso alcanza un umbral del 8%, no volveré a abrir la escuela. Iremos al aprendizaje remoto completo. El 8% es simplemente un umbral que es una métrica, sin embargo, me he estado reuniendo con funcionarios del Departamento de Salud Pública del Condado de Lake, y si la tasa de prueba de positividad fue del 8%, eso podría indicar la propagación de la comunidad, y eso podría indicar condiciones donde desfavorable a la apertura en persona. No hay absolutos aquí, sin embargo, te estoy dando orientación sobre esto. En este momento, estamos en 4.3%. En este momento, el promedio positivo de siete días indica que la propagación de la comunidad no es tal que me prohibirá pedirle a la gente que venga en persona. De nuevo, esa es una forma de verlo.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
También observamos la disponibilidad de camas en la unidad de cuidados intensivos, y observamos otras métricas que están saliendo del Departamento de Salud Pública del Condado de Lake y del Departamento de Salud Pública de Illinois. Una clave aquí es que queremos que los estudiantes vuelvan a la escuela, pero queremos hacerlo de una manera segura y responsable.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Hablando educativamente, nuestros niños necesitan estar en la escuela. Desde el punto de vista educativo, debemos centrarnos en la lectura, la escritura, la aritmética en persona y luego los estudios sociales, las ciencias, las artes creativas y todas las otras increíbles experiencias escolares en vivo a través de la web o lo que llamamos asíncrono. Estamos viendo una experiencia escolar de cinco horas al día, que es significativamente diferente de lo que hicimos la primavera pasada.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Estas son métricas. Estamos mirando los departamentos de salud. Queremos ver si es seguro. En el próximo segmento del episodio de hoy de Lighthouse 112, vamos a hablar sobre algunos de los conflictos relacionados con la planificación de reapertura que no implica la reapertura de todo el día. Manténganse al tanto.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Uno de los mayores dilemas de un sistema escolar público es cómo cuidar a los niños durante el día cuando hay una crisis de salud pública que interrumpe la forma normal de hacer negocios y ayuda a las familias y la economía a funcionar y lidiar con los desafíos, cambios y dilemas. Si observa las horas del modelo híbrido del Distrito 112, desde kinder hasta quinto grado, estamos viendo una sesión de 8:40 a 10:55 am. En nuestra programación de cuidado de niños antes del cuidado con Innovation Learning, los padres pueden dejar a sus hijos a las 6:30 y pueden estar en la escuela hasta las 10:55, por lo que ofrecemos una opción de tipo de cuidado de niños de poco más de cuatro horas, 6:30 de la mañana hasta justo antes de las 11:00, o si tomaron el autobús para llegar a casa, 11:30. Se podría decir de 6:30 a 11:30, cinco horas de atención. Si los niños están en la sesión de la tarde de las 12:55 a las 3:10, también permitiremos el cuidado de los niños hasta las 6:00 de la tarde. Digamos que el niño fue recogido en el autobús a las 12:30. Tienes alrededor de 5, 5,5 horas de atención.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
En el Distrito 112, mientras ofrecemos cinco horas de instrucción, también ofrecemos un par de horas de atención previa si está en la sesión de la mañana, atención posterior si está en la sesión de la tarde. . También queremos enfatizar, como hice en el último segmento, que el aprendizaje no se limita a la persona. Los maestros están trabajando muy duro para proporcionar instrucción sincrónica o en vivo, estudios sociales y ciencias, por ejemplo, o asincrónica, podrían ser estudios sociales y ciencias, una mezcla de vivo y no vivo, y también inglés y matemáticas. Mi punto de estar aquí es con respecto al cuidado de niños, estamos ofreciendo mucho más que las dos horas en persona para nuestras familias.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Ahora, si analizamos algunas de las inquietudes, quejas o controversias que algunas personas de la comunidad han estado compartiendo con respecto al tema del cuidado de niños, la gente está preocupada de que esto simplemente no sea suficiente y de que El distrito escolar público debe brindar atención a tiempo completo mientras la gente está trabajando. También afecta a nuestros propios empleados, nuestros propios maestros y personal de apoyo.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Reconocemos y afirmamos el impacto que COVID-19, la pandemia mundial tiene en la economía, ha tenido en el cuidado de los niños, ha tenido en las familias trabajadoras. En nuestro modelo de regreso a la escuela, estas horas permitirán un cierto grado de son, y es lo máximo que podemos hacer con seguridad. No podemos aumentar las cápsulas o cohortes o colecciones de niños durante la fase 4 de Illinois Restore Illinois, no más de 50, en primer lugar. Tampoco podemos proporcionar el tipo de cuidado de niños que se busca. Pedimos a la comunidad. Pedimos al bien de la sociedad que trabaje en ello. No nos disculpamos por ello. El sistema escolar público va a proporcionar una educación escolar pública excepcional.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Sin embargo, nos damos cuenta, y hago una gran pausa, qué haremos para nuestros maestros que viven en diferentes comunidades cuyos distritos escolares pueden ofrecer cuidado infantil y nada, y luego qué se supone que deben hacer. ? Este es un dilema para el que no tenemos una buena respuesta en este momento, y lo entendemos. Ciertamente no estamos sordos a eso. Nos importa absolutamente y somos compasivos al respecto. Este es uno de los muchos desafíos para intentar dirigir las escuelas en persona.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Una vez más, el punto principal de este segmento es mostrar y aclarar las horas del modelo híbrido del Distrito 112 con el hecho de que tenemos opciones de cuidados previos y posteriores a cierto grado disponibles. Ciertamente no es perfecto. Nada es perfecto, pero este ha sido un gran problema reciente. Es como lidiar con eso, y todavía no estamos seguros. Simplemente no lo sabemos todavía. En el próximo segmento, vamos a hablar un poco más sobre algunos de los elementos del modelo híbrido y por qué estamos haciendo medio día de cinco días a la semana y no A / B como lo están haciendo en otros lugares, así que estad atentos.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Una pregunta que he estado escuchando mucho … Es, de nuevo, todas estas preguntas son excelentes. Ninguno de nosotros ha tenido que pasar por esto, pero una pregunta que he escuchado mucho es por qué hace cinco días a la semana medio día con niños en persona durante poco más de dos horas en lugar de dirigir lo que otras organizaciones llama a un modelo A / B, ¿tal vez tener dos días completos con la mitad de los niños y luego tres días libres? ¿Por qué estamos eligiendo el nuestro?

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Bueno, basado en nuestro proceso de planificación, que tuvo más de 50 miembros de la comunidad, padres, miembros de la junta, profesores, personal de apoyo, administradores, expectativas de Harvard, así como nuestra experiencia en nuestro equipo de liderazgo, en nuestro gabinete sobre lo que es mejor para los estudiantes, nuestros estudiantes han carecido de consistencia, previsibilidad y rutina desde el 12 de marzo. Creemos que cinco días a la semana, la lectura, la escritura y la aritmética enfocadas consistentemente en persona con cinco días a la semana, algunos en vivo, otros no, estudios sociales, ciencia, artes y todo en un día de cinco días con la combinación de en persona y en casa es correcto, es el mejor modelo para nuestro distrito escolar.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Ahora, además, con base en nuestras instalaciones, viejo, realmente en mal estado, no es algo nuevo, y si conoce el Distrito 112, esta ha sido la batalla de una década, o tres décadas, casi un tercio de un siglo de batalla. No podemos distanciarnos físicamente. No podemos cumplir de manera segura con los reglamentos de IDPH e ISBE, no podemos ejecutar la mitigación de riesgos y salud que creemos que es necesaria para garantizar la seguridad de nuestro personal y la seguridad de nuestros estudiantes. No podemos hacer eso si los niños están en la escuela todo el día.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Hemos analizado esto. Hemos estudiado esto. Hemos revisado esto. Nuestro modelo actual pone a los niños en pequeños grupos. Los niños están en pequeñas cohortes. Se fueron. Tenemos un proceso de limpieza riguroso y hospitalario. Entra otro grupo de niños. Se van. Tenemos otro riguroso proceso de limpieza de grado hospitalario, y lo repetimos.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
No queremos que los niños se congreguen en grupos más grandes que sus clases de 10-15, quizás 20 en la escuela secundaria en un área más grande. No queremos tener que preocuparnos por la comida y comer en el campus. No queremos eso. No queremos grandes congregaciones de niños, por lo que no estamos haciendo el modelo de todo el día. Sabemos que esto tiene un impacto negativo en las necesidades de cuidado infantil para las familias. Entendemos que, potencial impacto negativo.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Nuestro enfoque, nuestro impulso, nuestra priorización y nuestras compensaciones son el aprendizaje, la enseñanza, la salud, la seguridad, el bienestar de nuestros niños y nuestro personal, y es por eso que no vamos a hacer ninguna otra configuración si podemos traer niños en persona, lo cual esperamos. Una vez más, nos enfrentamos a un virus, pero esa es la razón. Lo hemos estudiado. No funciona para nuestras escuelas. No funciona para nuestra capacidad de mitigar riesgos y mantener a nuestro personal seguro, lo cual es de suma importancia. En el siguiente segmento, vamos a hablar sobre un par de “qué pasa si”. Manténganse al tanto.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Muy bien, voy a llamar a este segmento el segmento deprimente y aterrador. ¿Qué pasa si realmente podemos abrir en persona y la difusión de la comunidad es baja y las cosas van bien? Eso será asombroso. Este segmento no se trata de eso. Este segmento es sobre ¿qué pasa si un niño da positivo por COVID-19? ¿Qué pasa si un miembro del personal da positivo por COVID-19? ¿Qué pasa si tenemos conductores de autobuses que no pueden presentarse a trabajar? ¿Qué sucede si tenemos personas de cuidados previos de Innovation Learning que están dando positivo por COVID-19?

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
La verdad aquí es que si podemos abrir en persona nuestro modelo híbrido, todo funciona y todos se mantienen saludables, será fenomenal, será increíble. Atemorizante, aterrador y deprimente, este virus es vicioso y es probable que,a pesar de todos nuestros mejores esfuerzos, COVID-19 nos afecte.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
La parte deprimente de este episodio es que en cualquier momento durante el modelo en persona, si podemos abrir en persona, estamos preparados para volver a un modelo de aprendizaje remoto. Solo quiero que la gente entienda eso. La razón por la que esto es tan complicado y un poco frustrante para algunos y un poco abrumador para todos nosotros es porque, A, nunca se había hecho antes de esta manera, B, son muchas incógnitas y no tenemos un control, y Como sociedad, tomamos desesperadamente el control y nos gusta el control, y hay “¿qué pasa si esto, qué pasa si eso, qué pasa si esto, qué pasa si eso?” Lo que diré es que estamos trabajando literalmente directamente con el Departamento de Salud del Condado de Lake, funcionarios del Departamento de Salud Pública de Illinois y en nuestras áreas locales en el Sistema Hospitalario de la Universidad NorthShore en estas mismas preguntas. Es el 26 de julio. No tengo todas las respuestas. Podemos abrir escuelas el 3 de septiembre en persona. Podemos abrir escuelas el 3 de septiembre totalmente a distancia.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
La gente ha preguntado sobre las pruebas. Estamos investigando la posibilidad de obtener pruebas precisas de acción rápida en nuestra área. No puedo garantizar nada, pero estamos investigando eso. También estamos tratando de ser muy explícitos y claros en diagramas de flujo fáciles de entender. Si un niño tiene esto, ¿qué hacemos? Si una clase tiene esto, ¿qué hacemos? La parte deprimente de este segmento es que hay tantas incógnitas, pero les diré que debemos buscar la experiencia de los expertos en esta área. Sé que probablemente estés pensando: “Bueno, eso no era una hamburguesa de nada”, y me disculpo, pero hay muchas cosas desconocidas. El siguiente segmento es el segmento final de este breve episodio, y les diré cuáles son los próximos pasos.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
¿Qué va a pasar después? Hoy es 26 de julio. Un pequeño resumen rápido. En junio, formamos nuestro comité de partes interesadas y nuestro proceso de planificación. Hemos celebrado varias reuniones. Seguiremos encontrándonos. Me dirigí a la junta formalmente el 9 de junio. Me dirigí formalmente a la junta el 30 de junio. Todos nuestros materiales están en nuestro sitio web, www.nssd112.org. Tenemos una página COVID-19. Tenemos una página de “mantenerse saludable en 112”. Tenemos una página de la junta de educación. Todo esta ahi.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Nos reunimos con la junta el 21 de julio. Hemos recopilado más de 1,500 preguntas y comentarios a través de algunos documentos de generación de preguntas frecuentes. Hemos lanzado las Preguntas Frecuentes 1.0. Estamos trabajando en 2.0, que se lanzará dentro de una semana. Hemos recibido varias solicitudes de aclaración. Celebramos seminarios web de una hora, siete de ellos con los miembros de nuestro personal la semana pasada, siete horas de ayuntamientos internos para hacer preguntas, hablar y escuchar. Tuvimos un seminario web del Ayuntamiento de Student Voice antes de eso. Mañana por la noche, 27 de julio, habrá una presentación de habla hispana para familias de habla hispana de 1,000 de nuestros 4,000 estudiantes en esa categoría, así que vamos a hablar en español directamente a nuestras familias de habla hispana y responderemos sus preguntas. .

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
El martes 28 de julio tenemos tres reuniones en una. 6:00, tenemos una reunión especial para hacer algunas cosas de empleados, a las 6:15, tenemos una reunión de la comunidad de la instalación que hablará específicamente sobre la calidad del aire con este plan en particular para reabrir sobre el cual yo Hemos estado discutiendo esta mañana en este episodio, así como algunos de los desafíos que enfrentamos en nuestro distrito y en nuestras instalaciones antiguas. También tendremos al menos una discusión de una, quizás dos horas, sobre la reapertura.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Voy a compartir actualizaciones sobre la encuesta del personal con respecto a los niveles de comodidad de nuestro personal de regresar al trabajo en las condiciones que hemos establecido y que hemos destacado hoy en Lighthouse 112. Nosotros ‘ También vamos a dar una actualización a la comunidad sobre las encuestas para padres que optan por el modelo híbrido en persona o se excluyen a través del modelo virtual híbrido como mencioné anteriormente en este episodio. Aproximadamente el 85% de los padres, K-8, parecen optar en persona. Obviamente, veremos esos datos y le enviaremos actualizaciones el martes por la noche.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Entonces, ¿qué pasa? Seguimos planeando. Trabajamos en logística y horarios. Formamos contratos de limpieza, transporte, materiales curriculares. Continuamos entrenando a nuestros maestros y personal de apoyo. Seguimos escuchando a la gente. Revisamos nuestras preguntas frecuentes para estar al día con las 1.500 entradas que tenemos, y esperamos y observamos. Observamos lo que sucede en otros distritos escolares vecinos que han optado por híbridos o totalmente remotos. Observamos las métricas del Departamento de Salud Pública del Condado de Lake, las Métricas del Departamento de Salud Pública de Illinois cuando nos acercamos al 3 de septiembre. La próxima reunión de la junta será el 18 de agosto, a menos que la junta me indique que tenga una reunión antes.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Amigos, todos estamos en esto hoy. Todos estamos afectados por esto juntos. Amamos a nuestros hijos. Amamos a nuestro personal. Necesitamos trabajar juntos para encontrar una estrategia inteligente, reflexiva y de mitigación de riesgos para proporcionar educación en estos tiempos sin precedentes de una pandemia global. Agradecemos a todos ustedes que se han comunicado. Te agradecemos que me escuches. También apreciamos un poco de paciencia y gracia mientras tratamos de superar esto juntos. Nuestra fecha de inicio es actualmente el 3 de septiembre. Ya veremos a dónde vamos. Nos mantendremos informados. Manténganse al tanto. Recuerde, en el Distrito 112, inspiramos, innovamos y nos involucramos.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Gracias por escuchar Lighthouse 112, el podcast del superintendente de escuelas del Distrito Escolar 112 de North Shore. Somos un distrito escolar público PK-8 en el noreste de Illinois. Este podcast es una fuente de información sobre el distrito escolar, su liderazgo, sus maestros y estudiantes, y su comunidad. Es otra fuente de actualizaciones y una fuente adicional de noticias sobre la narrativa cambiante de la educación pública. Inspirar. Innovar. Contratar.

Dr. Michael Lubelfeld:
Este podcast se puede escuchar y escuchar en Anchor, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Breaker, Overcast, PocketCast, RadioPublic, Stitcher y otras fuentes que se agregan todo el tiempo. Vuelva a consultar y suscríbase para estar al día con lo que está sucediendo en el Distrito Escolar 112 de North Shore. Visite también nuestro sitio web, www.nssd112.org. Muchas gracias por escuchar y por su interés.

Skip to toolbar