Michael Buss Interview – English/Spanish Translation

Transcript of Podcast in English and in Spanish follows, Thanks to Rev for English and Jessica D for Spanish!

Dr. Lubelfeld:

This is Lighthouse 112, the podcast from the Superintendent of Schools in North Shore School District 112. We’re a pre-K through 8 public school district in northeast Illinois. This podcast is a source of information about the school district, its leadership, its teachers, its students, and its community. It’s another source of updates and an additional source of news regarding the changing narrative of public education. Inspire, innovate, engage.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Good afternoon and welcome. Today, we’re interviewing legendary teacher, Michael Buss at Edgewood Middle School. He’s also a community member in District 112 and really an overall great guy. In today’s episode, we’re going to learn more about Michael, his leadership story, his career journey and aspirations, proud moments, and thoughts regarding COVID-19, as well as anything he wants to share. So Michael, thanks again for joining today, and thanks for all of your great work on behalf of students and our district every day. It’s fantastic to have you on Lighthouse 112 to share the voice of a teacher, especially during the strange COVID-19 remote teaching scenario.

Michael Buss:

All right. Well, thank you, Dr. Lubelfeld, for having me on the podcast. It’s very exciting. I’m thrilled to be here. It’s just another way to be involved and be a part of the community and have our voices heard. So I’ll just start off by giving a little bit of background and give my educational journey and how I got to where I am today. So 15 years ago is when my journey in education started. I mean, of course, it starts before that. We could go back to Mr. Kuhn’s English class junior year and what really was like, “Dang, that guy’s doing it right.” So, but really 15 years ago is when I landed my first teaching gig and that was actually in San Diego, California; actually in Encinitas, San Diego County.

Michael Buss:

I landed a gig, and I was just so fortunate. I ended up at a small private college prep 6 through 12 school called the Grauer School, one of the small schools in the country. And it gave me a lot of liberty to do some really cool things. And it was a great first gig with a really remarkable leader. The principal, the director of the school, and the founder, Stuart Grauer, who was just awesome. And I taught humanities there, so I got to take my two favorite subjects. It was actually American Literature and US History and I got to teach them together, which was a lot of fun. So I would teach The Crucible while examining the McCarthy era and things like that, so just a lot of fun.

Michael Buss:

I am a Chicago area native, so that was actually just an attempt to try to avoid winter and get away and not do the whole winter thing anymore. It turns out there’s more to life than the weather and San Diego left some things that were lacking and that I ended up wanting to come back to the Chicago area for, not the least of which was I felt drawn to get involved in inner-city education. So I really targeted Chicago public schools on my return from California and landed my first gig in Chicago at Dunbar Vocational Career Academy. It’s located at 31st and King Drive near McCormick Place. Actually, a cool story: it was created during World War II as a vocational school for black men. So they would bring them in and teach them these skills that they could then take out into the world and create a livelihood for themselves and their families.

Michael Buss:

Of course, flash-forward and desegregation and letting the girls join too: it remained a vocational school, which was really cool. It was cool to be a part of that. And they had everything from like automotive up to medical academy. I ended up teaching a lot of the medical academy courses and teaching a biomedical debate group. I was the coach of that. So we had some really cool experiences at Dunbar and spent six years there teaching reading, English, and you name it, social studies, I probably taught it at all at Dunbar over the six years. So, that was really cool.

Michael Buss:

After Dunbar, there were some funny leadership issues at Dunbar that it seemed time and right to move on at that point. And I ended up getting a job at Clemente High School, which it’s at Division and Western (in Chicago). A lot of people know the building. It’s a big black box. And at Clemente, I actually had a wild experience there with my first day of school with students. I don’t even know if you’re aware of this story. Actually the night before, I was having these weird dreams where I was having trouble walking and these really weird things, like what is wrong with me? And then I woke up and I was having trouble walking and I was having these weird experiences. And I was like, it’s the first day with students at a brand new school. We’re going to work, right?

Michael Buss:

So I get in the car, I’m white-knuckling it, trying to keep it in. I’m thinking to myself, “My gosh, this might not be the best idea.” I get there and flash-forward, the bell rings, kids are on their way up. I’m not well. I get sick in a garbage can in the classroom. I’m like, “I got to figure something out.” I had to go downstairs and talk to the administrator, the principal, “Let’s figure this out.” I’m like, “I don’t know what’s going on but I think I need to go to the emergency room.”

Michael Buss:

So they’re like, “Well, there’s a hospital right next door and there’s one up the road,” something I don’t think you would have ever done.

Michael Buss:

And I’m like, “I should walk there?”

Michael Buss:

And they said, “Yeah. Yeah, go ahead. You’re fine.”

Michael Buss:

And I’m like, “Okay.” So I exited the building, I escorted myself across the street down Division and admitted myself to the emergency room and had a conversation with the ER doctor. And we went back and forth and we were talking. And he’s like, “Let’s do a scan of that brain of yours and see what’s going on in there.”

Michael Buss:

And I’m a positive guy, always have been. And I was like, “Okay, sure. Why not?”

Michael Buss:

At this point my wife is on her way to the city to come to yell at me, more than anything, like, “You idiot, what are you going to work for?”

Michael Buss:

And so the doc comes back in and he says, “Mr. Buss, I have to tell you, you have a mass in your head.”

Michael Buss:

And I thought that was a joke because a mass could be my brain: “You’re talking about my brain. Oh, that’s a good one.”

Michael Buss:

He’s like, “No, Mr. Buss, I wouldn’t joke about something like this.” So it’s a long story short, maybe too late for that already, but I ended up having a golf ball-sized hemangioblastoma brain tumor in my cerebellum, right? So it’s like, whoa, one of those experiences where … And at this point, my oldest was three and my now middle child was one. So all of a sudden you get this perspective of like, holy cow.

Michael Buss:

So right away, the emergency room doctor at Saint Elizabeth says, “We have a neurosurgery department here on staff and you need to get this taken care of. This is not something that you can just deal with.”

Michael Buss:

And I said, “Time out. I have a doctor, I’d like to talk to him first.”

Michael Buss:

So I talked to my doctor and he ends up lining something up. He’s like, “No, you’re not having surgery there. We’ll take care of this.” He’s like, “We’ll get you released and we’ll get going.” And another cool part of this story is that he ended up getting me with the chair of the department at Evanston Hospital who just so happens to be the doctor that is played by Alec Baldwin in the movie Concussion.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

No, way. Wow. Okay, that is something.

Michael Buss:

Yeah, so he did. He pulled out all the stops and he made sure I was in the best hands out there. Dr. Julian Bailes took care of me. I had ended up having 11-hour brain surgery. And obviously, here we are, everything worked out.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Thank goodness, yes.

Michael Buss:

Yeah. I mean, it’s quite the story. You can’t relate. A lot of people have this near-death… And I don’t even know that I would say I was near death, but it was something that you contemplated. I had a week between the diagnosis and the surgery. So I started doing things like journaling to my kids, like, “I hope you’re reading this because I gave it to you when you’re 21 and you’re mad at me for something I did, and yeah, I’ll take that over you’re trying to figure out who your dad was.” Because I personally grew up without a father in my life. So I was like the last thing I wanted was for something like that to happen to my boys.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Of course.

Michael Buss:

Yeah, so that happened, and I missed a quarter of work, the first quarter of school, and ended up going back in the second quarter. It was a little bit of a struggle at first. And then, again, at Clemente, there were some interesting leadership decisions and things going on there that … And you hear this a lot in Chicago public and in a lot of other schools as well, but it was really hard. And I think after what I had been through, I was just like, all right, I need to make some moves. I need to figure something out. And I gave myself a deal. I was like, you got to figure something out. So I pursued some other endeavors. I dabbled in this, dabbled in that. And at the end of the day, actually the year after that year, I was ready to walk away from education just because I was getting so frustrated, and things just weren’t going well. And I was talking to colleagues at Clemente and they had mentioned that they saw an English opening at Edgewood Middle School.

Michael Buss:

And I said, “You know what? I have applied to Edgewood Middle School at least a half a dozen times. I’ve emailed back and forth with that principal. I keep trying.” I’m like, “Why should I bother?” So I did the whole … And as you know, the application process for schools is extensive. And every time I go in there, I would try to modify and make my resume better and do this. And for this one, what did I do? I was like, I don’t think there’s a chance. I’m just going to hit submit, and whatever. Of course, I hit submit, a couple of weeks later I get a phone call, and I learn that there’s a position and they would like to interview me.

Michael Buss:

So during the interview, we’re talking and the principal says, “I actually have a social studies position that just opened up and it seems like you’re a better fit for social studies.”

Michael Buss:

And I said, “I would agree with that.” So, long story short, ended up getting a social studies position six years ago now, so that was six years ago. So taught social studies at Edgewood. The first three years were eighth grade. And then as Elm Place population was getting smaller, there was a need to make room for another amazing teacher, Mr. John Whitehead, shout out.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Shout out to Mr. Whitehead!, that’s right.

Michael Buss:

Yeah. So, they asked if I would mind going to sixth-grade social studies to make room for him in eighth grade. I said, “Bring that man over. I love that guy.” I kind of look at him as almost like a role model of sorts; somebody else who lives in the community, has kids went through the school district, and actually went through Elm Place as well. And the fun story, my oldest will be starting at Edgewood next year.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Very cool. That’s really nice.

Michael Buss:

Yeah. So I lean on John a lot. I ask him for tips and advice, and he’s a good guy for that. And then when Elm Place closed, of course, there was some shuffling of teachers in placement and where people ended up needing to be. And the fact that I have that English endorsement and social studies and have experience in both, I ended up in English last year, when Elm Place closed. So these last two years, I’ve been in the English department and have been … Actually, it’s been really wild. It made my move to seventh grade English, which then completed my entire range of 6 through 12. I have now taught every grade from 6 through 12; as I say, pretty much every social studies. And I’ll tell you what, seventh grade, I don’t know that I have ever seen more growth in a year than in any of those in 6 through 12. It’s a lot of fun.

Michael Buss:

So yeah, that’s my story. English, the last two years. I joke that as a seventh grade English teacher, my writing has improved, which has been pretty good. And I’ve been a graduate student in the last few years, as well. So, there’s definitely been a lot of perks and I’ve really just loved my experience at Edgewood. And I have great colleagues and the kids are amazing. The families are just so supportive and remarkable, and I’m just really proud to be a member and be an Eagle.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Well, I’m proud that you are an Eagle and proud that you’re in District 112, Michael. I’m grateful to you for spending time with us today. It really is nice to learn the background and the story of our teachers. And I knew a little bit about what you shared, but I learned and discovered more today than I knew, so I really appreciate that. Crazy weird coincidence: a good, good old friend of mine who I grew up with, went to junior high with, high school and everything, still friends with today, his dad was a long-time football coach at Clemente, Bill Galluzzi; May he rest in peace. Sadly, Bill passed away, but his son, John and I are good friends. And Bill was legendary at Clemente. So that’s an interesting and neat intersection in our stories. It’s kind of cool.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

We’re going to take a quick break, but just want to remind our listeners that Michael is one of many incredible teachers in District 112, incredible staff members. We have a diverse group of teachers at the helm of our classrooms. And with Lighthouse 112, it’s yet another way we can get the story out of our excellence and just how cool and deep our people are. When we return, we’re going to learn more about what’s on the mind of Michael Buss, teacher at Edgewood Middle School in North Shore School District 112. Please stay tuned.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

We are back with Edgewood Middle School teacher Michael Buss. We just have the chance to learn about his background, his story, and just the real neat life experiences that have shaped him as a teacher. And I think everyone can agree that we are lucky and fortunate to have Michael at the helm of our classrooms. Thank you so much again for your willingness to spend time today with me on Lighthouse 112, I really appreciate the interview. And I’m going to ask you to shift gears a little bit. As you know, we’ve been out of in-person schooling since March 13th. We’ve been engaged in teacher-directed e-learning since April 6th. Would you please spend some time sharing the teacher’s point of view on this unexpected and abrupt and total change as to how we do our business?

Michael Buss:

Yeah, for sure. What wild times we’re in, right? First of all, I wanted to thank you and the administration for your leadership during this time. I’ve said it in emails, I replied to tweets, I’ve thanked you many times because I think your leadership has been great, and you’re prioritizing of the highest needs I think has been really important and remains important.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Thank you.

Michael Buss:

The idea of Maslow over Bloom, right? We have to take care of our most basic needs first. And the fact that the two priorities on your list of four put those Maslow needs forward, first being food and then the safety, health, and welfare of the students and staff; I think it remains the most important thing and something that we definitely need to be aware of and cognizant of as we are navigating these completely uncharted waters. So, thank you for that, and regular communication. As you mentioned in the beginning, you’re going to over-communicate. And I think as time has gone on, it’s been more laser-focused and precise, and that’s been great too, and of course still focusing on learning and making sure that we’re doing the best that we can by the kids in the community.

Michael Buss:

So as a teacher with those four priorities, I feel in lockstep with that. And from my angle, of course, I’m not feeding the community like the district is, but for me, emotional wellbeing I think is my top priority as a teacher. I try to be very aware of what my kids are going through. And I really was hesitant in that first part of the interview talking about the tumor. It’s not something I lead with usually, but I felt like it was important because it helps you understand the perspective of having a trauma-informed approach, which again, thanks to Dr. Kevin Ryan for sharing an article with the staff about that from Teaching Tolerance. It was a great article that was like, we have to recognize that this is a traumatic time for kids, for families, for everybody, and we’re all in this together.

Michael Buss:

So I haven’t spoken to a single adult who hasn’t gone through at least a difficult time every single day. And some days are worse than others. You have days like today happens to be a gray, rainy day and that makes it a little bit harder when you can’t go outside. At least the days where we can enjoy our backyards or our driveways or a patio, it helps to be able to get a little sunshine and fresh air. And the fact that so many adults that I talk to on a regular basis are finding this to be so challenging, it makes me think about stepping back into the shoes when you were a kid when I was a kid. Think about how long a day felt, right? A day felt like a week.

Michael Buss:

So think about the eternity that these kids feel like they’re in right now. We’re stacking. If a day feels like a week, we’ve stacked practically a year’s worth of weeks on top of these kids’ backs. And it’s a lot. And they don’t have the coping mechanisms like we have. We have 20, 30, 40, whatever years of experience to rely on and fall back on, and the kids just don’t have that. So I try to be very much aware of that and what they’re going through, this eternity for them. And we need to be careful and aware of it. We owe it to them. I truly feel that they’re going to look back on this time and they’re going to remember what our priorities were.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Oh, I hope so.

Michael Buss:

And then I hope they look back at it in a positive way. And depending on where we are and what our circumstances are, I think that if we continue along the path we are, I think they’ll look back and have positive memories, I hope. Every story’s different and the only story I know is mine, and for every other person as well. But I just think about that from the kids’ angles. And I also think about, you hear the things about the kids falling behind and missing standards and things like that. Is that a thing that’s happening? My view on that is that everybody in the world right now is getting an education like nobody else in the world has ever gotten.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Exactly.

Michael Buss:

Yeah. So I mean, I feel like this is going to be a generation that is going to be more resilient. They’re going to have a deep perspective of what is important, and they’re going to have a strength of character that’s unknown for many generations in this country, at least. I had a professor who he’s actually an Iranian ex-pat, and we had a conversation in my very first grad class in my pursuit of the master’s in history. And we kind of all agreed Americans are kind of soft. We’ve had it pretty easy.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

We have.

Michael Buss:

And he has a daughter. He had posted something on Facebook that said she was writing a story about COVID-19. And he said, “This breaks my heart. She should be writing about unicorns and she should be writing about her plans for the weekend.” And she should. But I reminded him of our conversation and how this is tough and it’s going to build these character traits that these kids are going to have forever. And would we rather avoid this? Of course. But again, looking at the positives I think is key. And we have to realize that I think the education that this generation, these kids are getting are going to come out with something beyond anything that any school district or teacher can provide.

Michael Buss:

The teacher and the school district are now parents, they’re grandparents, they’re siblings, they are other people that are getting involved; YouTube, in a lot of ways; a lot of things like that. So the idea of falling behind is something I kind of have a hard time accepting. I just don’t feel like it’s the case. And in addition to that, we’re all in this together, the whole world. When we do end up back in school, we’re going to be starting from more or less the same place. And standards, they’re just written. Things are always revised. We can revise standards.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Yeah, I feel the same way. It’s interesting, Michael. I have a lot of webinars. I swear I’ve been on more Zoom meetings and webinars during this stay-at-home situation than ever in my life. And the nice thing is a lot of learning in nice chunks, yet a lot of conversations have been, “Oh my gosh, is there going to be a 50% loss of learning or 70%?”

Dr. Lubelfeld:

And a lot of my responses are, “Number one, if there are, maybe we rethink what are we supposed to be prioritizing?” You know what I’m saying?

Michael Buss:

Yeah.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

I don’t see a loss, per se. We work really hard as teachers and as administrators and as students and parents to make meaning and make value and add value out of this situation. It isn’t 8:00 to 3:00, live, synchronous, socialized work at home. It just isn’t that. So taking all of our expectations of what that is and what that was and trying to put it through our computer screens and our video conferencing, my personal, professional opinion? That’s a flawed assumption to start judging this based upon the internal and socialized in-person school. I think we’re going to come back and what is, is going to be.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

So, I don’t want to sound like an existential philosopher here, but I’ll say our students in grades pre-K through 8 are going to come to our classrooms, our teachers in grades pre-K through 8 are going to come to our classrooms. We’re going to roll up our sleeves, say, “Thank goodness we’re back together. I can’t wait to be back in person. Socialization and humanity matter in our schooling. And you know what? Whatever standards we left off on, we’ll pick back up. Whatever experiences we need, we’ll pick back up.”

Dr. Lubelfeld:

And many of my colleagues right now in real-time are worried that A, we won’t be able to come back fully in person and B, there may be some resurgence of this virus. You know what my response is? Okay, I’m planning to come back in person. If the public health experience says we can’t, guess what? We’re going to pivot. We’re going to take the best of what we’ve learned during this remote learning, apply it however we need to, and then we’re going to continue to apply our humanity, as we still have infused even in this artificial intelligence or distance world, and we’re simply going to make it spectacular, just like the people from Hurricane Katrina. They’re lawyers and doctors now, just like the people from earthquakes, just like everything.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Yeah, it kind of stinks that we’re not ending the year with you and your kids right now in school. Absolutely. You know what, though? We’ve got to sort of toughen up. And not in an uncaring, glib way, but this is life. We’re going to be okay. We love our kids, we love our teachers. So I appreciate your perspectives, really do. And I apologize for being preachy, yet I mean, there’s a lot of talking and a lot of thinking. We’re going to make it. We’re going to thrive and we’re going to be amazing. We can’t judge tomorrow on yesterday’s experience of judgment because tomorrow exists differently. I think it’s a silver lining, as you mentioned. I really appreciate that. Guess what? We’re going to do stuff new. We’re going to do things newly created. I genuinely think the teacher response has been superb and I think we’ve all said, “Okay, you know what? No one really knows what we’re doing, yet we’re going to do it really well. And every week we’re going to reiterate it.” I’m real proud of that. So I just wanted to share with you, I’m so proud of what we’re doing.

Michael Buss:

Thank you. Yeah. No, I agree. I think the teachers, the response, and all the work that everybody’s putting in this new like you said, this is, whatever this is, like what we’re doing … And each week it gets a little bit better and it gets a little bit easier. Or maybe not easy. I mean, it’s still hard, and I’m not going to lie. Still, every now and again, I’ll be like, “Oh, I’m not crying. You’re crying.”

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Right, exactly.

Michael Buss:

Right? And it’s a challenge, that’s for sure. And some are more fortunate than others. I’m lucky, in some ways. My wife is home, which in some ways is good. She lost about 75% of her income because a job of hers is gone.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

I’m so sorry.

Michael Buss:

Yeah, but the plus side is she’s here [crosstalk 00:27:14] she was going off to work. I don’t know how the teachers that don’t have that luxury, who have a spouse that either is going off to work or is expected to be performing for their work at 100% level like they were pre-quarantine … Kudos, hats off to those teachers. That is the ultimate challenge. And I’m fortunate that I have Jamie here helping out; well, not helping out. She’s kind of the teacher while I’m upstairs on my Zoom calls. I’m doing my stuff in the office and she’s downstairs with the kids in the kitchen, and they’re getting it done. I’m getting it done.

Michael Buss:

And then from the student side, too, there are the students who have a parent that’s going off to an essential job, or maybe one parent is at home or no parents are at home and a sibling my students’ age, a seventh-grader, is perhaps taking care of a third or a second-grader. These are all things [crosstalk 00:28:18] that we have to really consider and think about when we have our expectations and what we want to get done for our students. And I think, too, when we do come back, that’s something that we’re really good at, too. We’re really good at addressing the gaps, every teacher I’ve met. Individualized instruction, for sure; the idea of IEPs for special education students, of which I have one downstairs. He’s got a long IEP, but every good teacher is already doing that for every single student already anyway. So where the gaps are and where we need to catch up, we’re going to do that either when we get back to in-person or … Like you say, I mean, we’re going to get back in person someday.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Yeah. I’m planning to reopen our school district in person in August, whatever the dates are. And yeah, if someone says I can’t or it’s different, we’re going to come together as a community, we’re going to figure it out, and we’re going to execute learning in an absolutely amazing way. I long for the days when we can redo our school system, the way we’re accustomed, sprinkling in some of the new cool learning and new experiences of success that our teachers are learning and showing really immediately and really in changed ways. Maybe we’ll have 2% or 3% of our students who can’t or won’t fully attend school in person. People have asked me that, too. Maybe they’re medically fragile. Maybe there’s a trauma, some situation. Well, guess what? We’ve just proven, for better or for worse, we can turn on a dime in like two weeks and completely change our business delivery.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

I think we’ll be okay. I think our teachers are going to be way more than okay. And someone today, I was at a webinar, and they said, “How are you assessing your students’ standards acquisition or lack thereof between March and August?”

Dr. Lubelfeld:

And I said, “Well, we’re going to be arm-in-arm with our teachers, and we’re going to ask our teachers. Our teachers know what our students know.” And standardized assessment has its place. It’s not the end-all or be all. And there are other ways to operate besides standardized assessments every single day, and we’re going to rely on our teachers. We’ve got professional judgment. And like you said, we’re filling the gaps. And the biggest, biggest bottom line is we’re going to prioritize what’s really important because our kids socially and emotionally need to be together. And again, when it’s physically safe and the doctors say that; obviously all that, I take very seriously.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Yet there is an element of school that I don’t think anybody realized. And I joked with a teacher the other day, I said it was a lot better when you only have 10 evaluators, now you’ve got 4,000; meaning now that you’re practicing your craft in the homes of every child: holy moly. Talk about vulnerability. Please know that that’s not lost on me. That’s a really big deal. So yeah, I think grace, gratitude, appreciation, love, respect. I think that’s what should be directed at our teachers and our support staff. But I really have to thank you, my friend. You are just a really great guy, a great colleague, just a wonderful person. I’m proud to work with you. I’m proud to lead with you. And I genuinely look forward to the next few weeks we’ve got remotely. And then more importantly, as soon as we can get back in person, I really, really look forward to that. So Michael, any closing thoughts you want to end our episode with? I’m just going to thank you again, heartfelt gratitude for you being here and sharing yourself.

Michael Buss:

I have one more point. Are you a Saturday Night Live guy? Do you watch-

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Oh, I’ve loved Saturday Night Live since I was eight years old. Yeah, I’ve been watching it.

Michael Buss:

Okay, so I don’t know if you’ve seen the last two episodes: the first episode post-lock down, right? It was terrible. Tom Hanks episode, that one, it was so bad.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Yes.

Michael Buss:

And here’s the thing, these are people that are in the media industry, right? This is their jam. This is what they’re experts in, right? And it was bad, and I think they knew it. And they came back next week, a week later, and it was so much better. And that’s an analogy I just draw for us. And I don’t think we were that bad out of the gate, not as bad as SNL. So we’ve got that going for us.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

That’s right. We were better.

Michael Buss:

We were better out of the gate. And I think the same thing, though. We’re getting better and better. And like you said, we’re adding new things and new features and new components. And it’s a good time to try these things because I feel like there’s little risk. You go for it. If it fails, it fails, right. Okay.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Absolutely.

Michael Buss:

We tried. Our heart is there. We’re doing it for the right reason, and then it’s all about the kids. So yeah, thank you. Thank you for this opportunity.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

It was awesome. Thank you so much. Thank you to listeners of Lighthouse 112, and stay safe out there.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Thank you for listening to Lighthouse 112, the podcast from the Superintendent of Schools in the North Shore School District 112. We’re a pre-K through 8th-grade public school district in northeast Illinois. This podcast is a source of information about the school district, its leadership, its teachers and students, and its community. It’s another source of updates and an additional source of news regarding the changing narrative of public education. Our motto is to inspire, innovate, engage. This podcast can be listened to and heard on Anchor, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify Breaker, Overcast, radio, public Stitcher, and other sources are being added all the time. Please check back and subscribe to us to stay current with what’s going on in District 112. Please also visit our website at www.nssd112.org. Thank you so much for listening and for your interest.

SPANISH

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Este es el Faro 112, el podcast del Superintendente de Escuelas del Distrito Escolar 112 de North Shore. Somos un distrito escolar público de pre-kinder a 8º en el noreste de Illinois. Este podcast es una fuente de información sobre el distrito escolar, su liderazgo, sus maestros, sus estudiantes y su comunidad. Es otra fuente de actualizaciones y una fuente adicional de noticias sobre la cambiante narrativa de la educación pública. Inspirar, innovar, comprometerse.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Buenas tardes y bienvenidos. Hoy, estamos entrevistando al legendario maestro, Michael Buss de la Escuela Intermedia de Edgewood. También es un miembro de la comunidad del Distrito 112 y un gran tipo en general. En el episodio de hoy, vamos a aprender más sobre Michael, su historia de liderazgo, su trayectoria profesional y sus aspiraciones, sus momentos de orgullo y sus pensamientos sobre COVID-19, así como todo lo que quiera compartir. Así que Michael, gracias de nuevo por acompañarnos hoy, y gracias por todo su gran trabajo en nombre de los estudiantes y de nuestro distrito todos los días. Es fantástico tenerte en el Faro 112 para compartir la voz de un profesor, especialmente durante el extraño escenario de la enseñanza a distancia de COVID-19.

Michael Buss:

Ok. Bueno, gracias, Dr. Lubelfeld, por tenerme en el podcast. Es muy emocionante. Estoy encantado de estar aquí. Es otra forma de involucrarse y ser parte de la comunidad y que nuestras voces sean escuchadas. Así que empezaré dando un poco de información y dando mi viaje educativo y cómo llegué a donde estoy hoy. Así que hace 15 años es cuando comenzó mi viaje en la educación. Quiero decir, por supuesto, comienza antes de eso. Podríamos volver a la clase de inglés del Sr. Kuhn en el penúltimo año y lo que realmente fue como, “Dang, ese tipo lo está haciendo bien”. Así que, pero en realidad hace 15 años es cuando conseguí mi primer trabajo de maestro y eso fue en San Diego, California; en realidad en Encinitas, Condado de San Diego.

Michael Buss:

Conseguí un trabajo, y fui muy afortunado. Terminé en una pequeña escuela privada de preparación para la universidad de grados 6 a 12 llamada Grauer School, una de las pequeñas escuelas del país. Y me dio mucha libertad para hacer cosas realmente geniales. Y fue un gran primer empleo con un líder realmente notable. El director, el director de la escuela, y el fundador, Stuart Grauer, que fue simplemente impresionante. Y yo enseñaba humanidades allí, así que tuve que tomar mis dos asignaturas favoritas. En realidad era Literatura Americana e Historia de los Estados Unidos y pude enseñarlas juntas, lo cual fue muy divertido. Así que enseñaba El Crisol mientras examinaba la época de McCarthy y cosas así, así que fue muy divertido.

Michael Buss:

Soy un nativo del área de Chicago, así que eso fue en realidad sólo un intento de tratar de evitar el invierno y escapar y no pasar el invierno nunca más. Resulta que hay más en la vida que el clima y San Diego dejó algunas cosas que faltaban y por las que terminé queriendo volver al área de Chicago, y no menos importante fue que me sentí atraído a involucrarme en la educación del centro de la ciudad. Así que me dirigí a las escuelas públicas de Chicago a mi regreso de California y conseguí mi primera oportunidad en Chicago en la Academia de Carreras Profesionales de Dunbar. Está ubicada en la 31 y King Drive, cerca de McCormick Place. En realidad, una historia genial: fue creada durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial como una escuela vocacional para hombres negros. Así que los traían y les enseñaban estas habilidades que luego podían llevar al mundo y crear un medio de vida para ellos y sus familias.

Michael Buss:

Por supuesto, debido al desarrollo y la segregación y permitiendo que las niñas se unan también: seguía siendo una escuela de formación profesional, lo que era realmente genial. Era genial ser parte de eso. Y tenían de todo, desde la automoción hasta la academia de medicina. Terminé enseñando muchos de los cursos de la academia de medicina y enseñando un grupo de debate biomédico. Yo era el entrenador de eso. Así que tuvimos algunas experiencias muy buenas en Dunbar y pasamos seis años allí enseñando lectura, inglés, y lo que sea, estudios sociales, probablemente lo enseñé en Dunbar durante los seis años. Así que, eso fue realmente genial.

Michael Buss:

Después de Dunbar, hubo algunos problemas de liderazgo en Dunbar que pareció el momento y el lugar adecuado para seguir adelante en ese momento. Y terminé consiguiendo un trabajo en el instituto Clemente, que está en Division and Western (en Chicago). Mucha gente conoce el edificio. Es una gran caja negra. Y en Clemente, en realidad tuve una experiencia salvaje allí con mi primer día de escuela con los estudiantes. Ni siquiera sé si estás al tanto de esta historia. En realidad, la noche anterior, estaba teniendo estos sueños raros en los que tenía problemas para caminar y estas cosas realmente raras, como ¿qué me pasa? Y luego me desperté y tenía problemas para caminar y estaba teniendo estas experiencias extrañas. Y yo estaba como, es el primer día con los estudiantes en una escuela nueva. Vamos a trabajar, ¿verdad?

Michael Buss:

Así que me subo al auto, lo golpeo con los nudillos blancos, tratando de mantenerlo adentro. Estoy pensando para mí mismo, “Dios mío, esto podría no ser la mejor idea”. Llego allí y me doy cuenta, suena el timbre, los niños están subiendo. No estoy bien. Me pongo enfermo en un cubo de basura en la clase. Y digo: “Tengo que pensar en algo”. Tuve que bajar y hablar con el administrador, el director, “Vamos a resolver esto”. Y le dije: “No sé qué está pasando, pero creo que debo ir a la sala de emergencias”.

Michael Buss:

Así que están como, “Bueno, hay un hospital justo al lado y hay uno en la carretera”, algo que no creo que hubieras hecho nunca.

Michael Buss:

Y yo digo: “¿Debería caminar hasta allí?”

Michael Buss:

Y ellos dijeron, “Sí. Sí, adelante. Estás bien”.

Michael Buss:

Y yo digo: “Está bien”. Así que salí del edificio, me escolté a través de la calle por la División y me admití en la sala de emergencias y tuve una conversación con el médico de urgencias. Y fuimos de un lado a otro y estuvimos hablando. Y él dijo: “Hagamos un estudio de tu cerebro y veamos qué está pasando ahí”.

Michael Buss:

Y yo soy un tipo positivo, siempre lo he sido. Y yo estaba como, “Vale, claro. ¿Por qué no?”

Michael Buss:

En este momento mi esposa está en camino a la ciudad para venir a gritarme, más que nada, como, “Idiota, ¿para qué vas a trabajar?”

Michael Buss:

Y entonces el doctor regresa y dice, “Sr. Buss, tengo que decirle que tiene una masa en su cabeza.”

Michael Buss:

Y pensé que era una broma porque podría haber una masa en mi cerebro: “Estás hablando de mi cerebro. Oh, esa es buena.”

Michael Buss:

Él dice: “No, Sr. Buss, yo no bromearía con algo así”. Así que es una larga historia corta, tal vez demasiado tarde para eso ya, pero terminé teniendo un tumor cerebral hemangioblastoma del tamaño de una pelota de golf en mi cerebelo, ¿verdad? Así que es como, guau, una de esas experiencias en las que… Y en este punto, mi hijo mayor tenía tres años y mi ahora hijo mediano tenía uno. Así que de repente tienes esta perspectiva de como, Wow

Michael Buss:

Así que de inmediato, el médico de la sala de emergencias en Saint Elizabeth dice: “Tenemos un departamento de neurocirugía aquí en el personal y usted necesita para obtener este cuidado. Esto no es algo con lo que puedas lidiar.”

Michael Buss:

Y yo dije, “Espere un momento. Tengo un médico, me gustaría hablar con él primero”.

Michael Buss:

Así que hablé con mi médico y él terminó preparando algo. Me dijo: “No, no te vas a operar allí. Nosotros nos encargaremos de esto.” Él dice: “Te daremos el alta y nos pondremos en marcha”. Y otra parte genial de esta historia es que terminó consiguiéndome con el jefe del departamento del Hospital Evanston que resulta ser el médico que interpreta Alec Baldwin en la película Conmoción cerebral.

El Dr. Lubelfeld:

No, de ninguna manera. Vaya. Vale, eso es algo.

Michael Buss:

Sí, así que lo hizo. Se aseguró de que yo estuviera en las mejores manos. El Dr. Julian Bailes se ocupó de mí. Acabé teniendo una cirugía cerebral de 11 horas. Y obviamente, aquí estamos, todo funcionó.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Gracias a Dios, sí.

Michael Buss:

Sí. Quiero decir, es toda una historia. No se puede relacionar. Mucha gente tiene esta muerte cercana… Y ni siquiera sé si diría que estuve cerca de la muerte, pero fue algo que contemplaste. Tuve una semana entre el diagnóstico y la cirugía. Así que empecé a hacer cosas como escribir un diario para mis hijos, como, “Espero que estés leyendo esto porque te lo di cuando tienes 21 años y estás enojado conmigo por algo que hice, y sí, lo tomaré en cuenta cuando estés tratando de averiguar quién era tu papá”. Porque yo personalmente crecí sin un padre en mi vida. Así que lo último que quería era que algo así le pasara a mis hijos.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Por supuesto.

Michael Buss:

Sí, eso pasó, y me perdí un cuarto de trabajo, el primer cuarto de la escuela, y terminé volviendo en el segundo cuarto. Fue un poco difícil al principio. Y luego, de nuevo, en Clemente, hubo algunas decisiones de liderazgo interesantes y cosas que pasaron allí que … Y se oye esto mucho en las escuelas públicas de Chicago y en muchas otras escuelas también, pero fue muy difícil. Y creo que después de lo que había pasado, yo estaba como, muy bien, tengo que hacer algunos movimientos. Tengo que pensar en algo. Y me ofrecí un trato. Yo estaba como, tienes que pensar en algo. Así que seguí con otros esfuerzos. Me metí en esto, me metí en aquello. Y al final del día, en realidad el año siguiente a ese año, estaba listo para dejar la educación sólo porque me estaba frustrando mucho, y las cosas no iban bien. Y estaba hablando con mis colegas de Clemente y ellos mencionaron que vieron una vacante de inglés en la Escuela Secundaria Edgewood.

Michael Buss:

Y yo dije: “¿Sabes qué? He aplicado a la Escuela Secundaria Edgewood al menos media docena de veces. He enviado correos electrónicos de ida y vuelta con ese director. Sigo intentándolo”. Y yo digo: “¿Por qué debería molestarme?” Así que hice todo el… Y como sabes, el proceso de solicitud para las escuelas es extenso. Y cada vez que voy allí, trataría de modificar y mejorar mi currículum y hacer esto. Y para este, ¿qué hice? Yo estaba como, no creo que haya una oportunidad. Sólo voy a darle a “someter”, y lo que sea. Por supuesto, presioné enviar, un par de semanas después recibí una llamada telefónica, y me enteré de que había un puesto y que les gustaría entrevistarme.

Michael Buss:

Así que durante la entrevista, estamos hablando y el director dice, “En realidad tengo un puesto de estudios sociales que acaba de abrirse y parece que estás mejor preparado para estudios sociales.”

Michael Buss:

Y yo dije, “Estoy de acuerdo con eso.” Así que, para resumir, terminé consiguiendo un puesto de estudios sociales hace seis años, así que eso fue hace seis años. Así que enseñaba estudios sociales en Edgewood. Los primeros tres años fueron en octavo grado. Y luego, como la población de Elm Place se estaba reduciendo, había que hacer espacio para otro profesor increíble, el Sr. John Whitehead.

El Dr. Lubelfeld:

Saludos al Sr. Whitehead!, eso es.

Michael Buss:

Sí. Así que me preguntaron si me importaría ir a estudios sociales de sexto grado para hacerle sitio en octavo grado. Les dije: “Traigan a ese hombre. Me encanta ese hombre”. Lo veo casi como una especie de modelo a seguir; alguien que vive en la comunidad, que tiene hijos que pasaron por el distrito escolar, y que en realidad pasaron por Elm Place también. Y la historia divertida, mi hijo mayor empezará en Edgewood el año que viene.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Wow. Eso es muy bonito.

Michael Buss:

Sí. Así que me apoyo mucho en John. Le pido consejos y sugerencias, y es un buen tipo para eso. Y luego cuando Elm Place cerró, por supuesto, hubo un cambio de profesores en la colocación y donde la gente terminó necesitando estar. Y el hecho de que tengo ese apoyo de inglés y estudios sociales y tengo experiencia en ambos, terminé en inglés el año pasado, cuando Elm Place cerró. Así que estos dos últimos años, he estado en el departamento de inglés y he estado … En realidad, ha sido muy emocionante. Hice mi paso a Inglés de séptimo grado, que luego completó todo mi rango de 6 a 12. Ahora he enseñado todos los grados del 6 al 12; como digo, casi todos los estudios sociales. Y te diré algo, séptimo grado, no sé si alguna vez he visto más crecimiento en un año que en cualquiera de los de 6 a 12. Es muy divertido.

Michael Buss:

Así que sí, esa es mi historia. Inglés, los últimos dos años. Bromeo que como profesor de inglés de séptimo grado, mi escritura ha mejorado, lo cual ha sido bastante bueno. Y también he sido un estudiante de posgrado en los últimos años. Así que, definitivamente ha habido muchos beneficios y me ha encantado mi experiencia en Edgewood. Y tengo grandes colegas y los chicos son increíbles. Las familias me apoyan mucho y son extraordinarias, y estoy muy orgullosa de ser miembro y de ser un Eagle.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Estoy orgulloso de que seas un Águila y orgulloso de que estés en el Distrito 112, Michael. Te agradezco que hayas pasado tiempo con nosotros hoy. Es realmente agradable conocer los antecedentes y la historia de nuestros maestros. Y sabía un poco sobre lo que compartieron, pero hoy aprendí y descubrí más de lo que sabía, así que realmente lo aprecio. Una loca y extraña coincidencia: un viejo y buen amigo mío con el que crecí, con el que fui a la secundaria, al instituto y todo eso, y del que aún hoy soy amigo, su padre fue durante mucho tiempo entrenador de fútbol en Clemente, Bill Galluzzi; que en paz descanse. Lamentablemente, Bill falleció, pero su hijo, John y yo somos buenos amigos. Y Bill fue legendario en Clemente. Así que esa es una interesante y genial intersección en nuestras historias. Es algo genial.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Vamos a tomar un breve descanso, pero sólo queremos recordarles a nuestros oyentes que Michael es uno de los muchos maestros increíbles del Distrito 112, miembros del personal increíbles. Tenemos un grupo diverso de profesores al mando de nuestras aulas. Y con el Faro 112, es otra forma de sacar la historia de nuestra excelencia y de lo genial y profundo que es nuestro personal. Cuando regresemos, vamos a aprender más sobre lo que está en la mente de Michael Buss, profesor de la Escuela Intermedia Edgewood en el Distrito Escolar 112 de North Shore. Por favor, manténganse en sintonía.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Estamos de vuelta con el profesor de la Escuela Secundaria Edgewood Michael Buss. Tenemos la oportunidad de aprender sobre sus antecedentes, su historia, y las experiencias de la vida real que lo han formado como profesor. Y creo que todos pueden estar de acuerdo en que somos afortunados de tener a Michael al frente de nuestras aulas. Muchas gracias de nuevo por su voluntad de pasar tiempo conmigo hoy en el Faro 112, realmente aprecio la entrevista. Y voy a pedirles que cambien un poco de marcha. Como saben, hemos estado fuera de la escuela en persona desde el 13 de marzo. Hemos estado comprometidos en el aprendizaje electrónico dirigido por el profesor desde el 6 de abril. ¿Podría por favor pasar un tiempo compartiendo el punto de vista del profesor sobre este inesperado y abrupto y total cambio en la forma de hacer nuestro negocio?

Michael Buss:

Sí, seguro. En qué tiempos increíbles estamos, ¿verdad? En primer lugar, quería agradecerle a usted y a la administración por su liderazgo durante este tiempo. Lo he dicho en correos electrónicos, he respondido a tweets, te he dado las gracias muchas veces porque creo que tu liderazgo ha sido genial, y estás priorizando las necesidades más altas que creo que han sido realmente importantes y siguen siéndolo.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Gracias.

Michael Buss:

La idea de Maslow sobre Bloom, ¿verdad? Tenemos que atender nuestras necesidades más básicas primero. Y el hecho de que las dos prioridades de su lista de cuatro pongan esas necesidades de Maslow adelante, primero son los alimentos y luego la seguridad, la salud y el bienestar de los estudiantes y el personal; creo que sigue siendo lo más importante y algo de lo que definitivamente tenemos que ser conscientes y conocer mientras navegamos por estas aguas completamente inexploradas. Así que, gracias por eso, y por la comunicación regular. Como mencionaste al principio, vas a comunicarte en exceso. Y creo que a medida que ha pasado el tiempo, ha sido más preciso y enfocado en el lenguaje láser, y eso ha sido genial también, y por supuesto todavía se centra en el aprendizaje y en asegurarse de que estamos haciendo lo mejor que podemos por los niños de la comunidad.

Michael Buss:

Así que como profesor con esas cuatro prioridades, me siento en sintonía con eso. Y desde mi punto de vista, por supuesto, no estoy alimentando a la comunidad como lo hace el distrito, pero para mí, el bienestar emocional es mi principal prioridad como profesor. Trato de ser muy consciente de lo que mis hijos están pasando. Y realmente dudé en la primera parte de la entrevista al hablar del tumor. No es algo con lo que normalmente lidero, pero sentí que era importante porque te ayuda a entender la perspectiva de tener un enfoque informado sobre el trauma, lo cual, de nuevo, gracias al Dr. Kevin Ryan por compartir un artículo con el personal sobre eso de Teaching Tolerance. Fue un gran artículo que decía, tenemos que reconocer que este es un momento traumático para los niños, para las familias, para todos, y estamos todos juntos en esto.

Michael Buss:

Así que no he hablado con un solo adulto que no haya pasado por lo menos un momento difícil todos los días. Y algunos días son peores que otros. Tienes días como el de hoy que resulta ser un día gris y lluvioso y eso hace que sea un poco más difícil cuando no puedes salir. Por lo menos los días en que podemos disfrutar de nuestros patios o nuestras entradas, ayuda el poder tener un poco de sol y aire fresco. Y el hecho de que tantos adultos con los que hablo regularmente encuentren esto tan difícil, me hace pensar en volver a ponerme en los zapatos de cuando eras un niño cuando yo era un niño. Piensa en lo largo que fue el día, ¿verdad? Un día se sentía como una semana.

Michael Buss:

Así que piensa en la eternidad en la que estos niños se sienten como si estuvieran en este momento. Estamos apilando. Si un día parece una semana, hemos acumulado prácticamente un año de semanas sobre las espaldas de estos niños. Y es mucho. Y ellos no tienen los mecanismos de supervivencia que nosotros tenemos. Tenemos 20, 30, 40, cualquier año de experiencia para confiar y recurrir, y los niños no tienen eso. Así que trato de ser muy consciente de eso y de lo que están pasando, esta eternidad para ellos. Y tenemos que ser cuidadosos y conscientes de ello. Se lo debemos a ellos. Realmente siento que van a mirar atrás en este tiempo y van a recordar cuáles eran nuestras prioridades.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Oh, eso espero.

Michael Buss:

Y espero que lo miren de forma positiva. Y dependiendo de dónde estemos y cuáles sean nuestras circunstancias, creo que si continuamos por el camino en el que estamos, creo que mirarán atrás y tendrán recuerdos positivos, espero. Cada historia es diferente y la única historia que conozco es la mía, y la de todas las demás personas también. Pero sólo pienso en eso desde el punto de vista de los niños. Y también pienso en que se oyen cosas sobre los niños que se quedan atrás y que no cumplen con los estándares y cosas así. ¿Es eso algo que está sucediendo? Mi punto de vista es que todos en el mundo ahora mismo están recibiendo una educación como nadie más en el mundo ha recibido.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Exactamente.

Michael Buss:

Sí. Siento que esta será una generación que será más resistente. Van a tener una perspectiva profunda de lo que es importante, y van a tener una fuerza de carácter desconocida para muchas generaciones en este país, por lo menos. Tuve un profesor que en realidad es un ex-patriado iraní, y tuvimos una conversación en mi primera clase de grado en mi búsqueda de la maestría en historia. Y todos estuvimos de acuerdo en que los americanos son un poco débiles. Lo hemos tenido bastante fácil.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Lo hemos hecho.

Michael Buss:

Y tiene una hija. Había publicado algo en Facebook que decía que ella estaba escribiendo una historia sobre COVID-19. Y dijo, “Esto me rompe el corazón. Debería estar escribiendo sobre unicornios y debería estar escribiendo sobre sus planes para el fin de semana”. Y debería. Pero le recordé nuestra conversación y cómo esto es difícil y va a construir estos rasgos de carácter que estos niños van a tener para siempre. ¿Y preferiríamos evitar esto? Por supuesto. Pero de nuevo, mirar lo positivo creo que es la clave. Y tenemos que darnos cuenta de que creo que la educación que esta generación, estos chicos están recibiendo va a salir con algo más allá de cualquier cosa que cualquier distrito escolar o maestro pueda proporcionar.

Michael Buss:

El maestro y el distrito escolar son ahora padres, son abuelos, son hermanos, son otras personas que se están involucrando; YouTube, de muchas maneras; muchas cosas como esa. Así que la idea de quedarse atrás es algo que me cuesta aceptar. Simplemente no siento que sea el caso. Y además de eso, estamos todos juntos en esto, el mundo entero. Cuando volvamos a la escuela, empezaremos más o menos desde el mismo lugar. Y los estándares, sólo están escritos. Las cosas siempre se revisan. Podemos revisar los estándares.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Sí, yo siento lo mismo. Es interesante, Michael. Tengo un montón de seminarios web. Juro que he estado en más reuniones de Zoom y seminarios en esta situación de quedarse en casa que nunca en mi vida. Y lo bueno es que se aprende mucho en buenos pedazos, pero muchas conversaciones han sido, “Oh Dios mío, ¿va a haber una pérdida del 50% de aprendizaje o del 70%?”

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Y muchas de mis respuestas son: “Número uno, si las hay, tal vez nos replanteemos qué se supone que debemos priorizar”. ¿Entienden lo que digo?

Michael Buss:

Sí.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

No veo una pérdida. Trabajamos muy duro como profesores y como administradores y como estudiantes y padres para dar sentido y valor a esta situación. No son las 8:00 a las 3:00, trabajo en vivo, sincrónico y socializado en casa. Simplemente no es eso. Así que tomando todas nuestras expectativas de lo que es y lo que era y tratando de ponerlo a través de nuestras pantallas de ordenador y nuestra videoconferencia, mi opinión personal y profesional… Es una suposición errónea para empezar a juzgar esto basado en la escuela interna y socializada en persona. Creo que vamos a volver y lo que es, va a ser.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Por lo tanto, no quiero sonar como un filósofo existencial aquí, pero diré que nuestros estudiantes en los grados pre-K a 8 van a venir a nuestras aulas, nuestros maestros en los grados pre-K a 8 van a venir a nuestras aulas. Nos arremangaremos y diremos: “Gracias a Dios que estamos juntos de nuevo”. No puedo esperar a estar de vuelta en persona. La socialización y la humanidad importan en nuestra escuela. ¿Y sabes qué? Cualquier estándar que dejamos, lo retomaremos. Cualquier experiencia que necesitemos, la retomaremos”.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Y muchos de mis colegas ahora mismo en tiempo real están preocupados de que A, no podamos volver completamente en persona y B, pueda haber algún resurgimiento de este virus. ¿Sabes cuál es mi respuesta? Bien, estoy planeando volver en persona. Si la experiencia en salud pública dice que no podemos, ¿adivina qué? Vamos a pivotar. Vamos a tomar lo mejor de lo que hemos aprendido durante este aprendizaje a distancia, aplicarlo como sea necesario, y luego vamos a seguir aplicando nuestra humanidad, como todavía nos hemos infundido incluso en este mundo de inteligencia artificial o a distancia, y simplemente vamos a hacerlo espectacular, al igual que la gente del huracán Katrina. Ahora son abogados y médicos, como la gente de los terremotos, como todo.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Sí, parece que no terminemos el año contigo y tus hijos ahora mismo en la escuela. Por supuesto que sí. ¿Sabe qué, sin embargo? Tenemos que endurecernos. Y no de una manera indiferente y simplista, pero así es la vida. Vamos a estar bien. Amamos a nuestros hijos, amamos a nuestros profesores. Así que aprecio sus perspectivas, de verdad. Y me disculpo por ser sermoneador, pero hay mucho que hablar y mucho que pensar. Vamos a lograrlo. Vamos a prosperar y vamos a ser increíbles. No podemos juzgar el mañana por la experiencia de ayer, porque el mañana existe de manera diferente. Creo que es un resquicio de esperanza, como has mencionado. Lo aprecio mucho. ¿Adivina qué? Vamos a hacer cosas nuevas. Vamos a hacer cosas nuevas. Realmente creo que la respuesta de los profesores ha sido magnífica y creo que todos hemos dicho, “Vale, ¿sabes qué? Nadie sabe realmente lo que estamos haciendo, pero lo vamos a hacer muy bien. Y cada semana vamos a reiterarlo”. Estoy muy orgulloso de eso. Así que sólo quería compartir contigo, estoy muy orgullosa de lo que estamos haciendo.

Michael Buss:

Gracias. Sí. No, estoy de acuerdo. Creo que los profesores, la respuesta, y todo el trabajo que todo el mundo está poniendo en este nuevo como dijiste, esto es, lo que sea, como lo que estamos haciendo … Y cada semana se pone un poco mejor y se hace un poco más fácil. O tal vez no sea fácil. Quiero decir, sigue siendo difícil, y no voy a mentir. Sin embargo, de vez en cuando, voy a ser como, “Oh, no estoy llorando. Estás llorando”.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Correcto, exactamente.

Michael Buss:

¿Verdad? Y es un desafío, eso es seguro. Y algunos son más afortunados que otros. Yo soy afortunado, en cierto modo. Mi esposa está en casa, lo que en cierto modo es bueno. Perdió cerca del 75% de sus ingresos porque un trabajo suyo ya no existe.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Lo siento mucho.

Michael Buss:

Sí, pero el lado positivo es que ella está aquí… se iba a trabajar. No sé cómo los profesores que no tienen ese lujo, que tienen su pareja que o bien se va a trabajar o se espera que se desempeñe en su trabajo a un nivel del 100% como si estuvieran en precuarentena … Felicidades, me quito el sombrero ante esos profesores. Ese es el último desafío. Y soy afortunado de tener a Jamie aquí ayudando; bueno, no ayudando. Ella es una especie de maestra mientras yo estoy arriba en mis llamadas de Zoom. Estoy haciendo mis cosas en la oficina y ella está abajo con los niños en la cocina, y lo están haciendo. Lo estoy haciendo.

Michael Buss:

Y también desde el lado de los estudiantes, hay estudiantes que tienen un padre que se va a un trabajo esencial, o tal vez un padre está en casa o no hay padres en casa y un hermano de la edad de mis estudiantes, un estudiante de séptimo grado, está quizás cuidando a un tercero o a un estudiante de segundo grado. Estas son todas las cosas que tenemos que considerar y pensar cuando tenemos nuestras expectativas y lo que queremos hacer por nuestros estudiantes. Y creo, también, que cuando volvemos, es algo en lo que somos muy buenos. Somos muy buenos para abordar las lagunas, todos los profesores que he conocido. Instrucción individualizada, seguro; la idea de los IEPs para los estudiantes de educación especial, de los cuales tengo uno abajo. Tiene un IEP largo, pero todos los buenos maestros ya lo hacen para cada estudiante. Así que donde están las lagunas y donde tenemos que ponernos al día, vamos a hacer eso ya sea cuando volvamos en persona o … Como dices, quiero decir, vamos a volver en persona algún día.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Sí. Estoy planeando reabrir nuestro distrito escolar en persona en agosto, en cualquier fecha. Y sí, si alguien dice que no puedo o que es diferente, nos uniremos como comunidad, lo resolveremos y ejecutaremos el aprendizaje de una manera absolutamente asombrosa. Anhelo los días en que podamos rehacer nuestro sistema escolar, la forma en que estamos acostumbrados, rociando algunos de los nuevos aprendizajes geniales y las nuevas experiencias de éxito que nuestros profesores están aprendiendo y mostrando de forma realmente inmediata y realmente cambiada. Tal vez tengamos un 2% o un 3% de nuestros estudiantes que no pueden o no quieren asistir completamente a la escuela en persona. La gente también me ha preguntado eso. Tal vez sean médicamente frágiles. Tal vez haya un trauma, alguna situación. Bueno, ¿adivina qué? Acabamos de probar, para bien o para mal, que podemos encender una moneda de diez centavos en unas dos semanas y cambiar completamente nuestra entrega de negocios.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Creo que estaremos bien. Creo que nuestros profesores van a estar más que bien. Y alguien hoy, estaba en un webinar, y dijo, “¿Cómo evalúa la adquisición o falta de adquisición de estándares de sus estudiantes entre marzo y agosto?”

El Dr. Lubelfeld:

Y yo dije, “Bueno, vamos a estar mano a mano con nuestros profesores, y vamos a preguntar a nuestros profesores. Nuestros profesores saben lo que nuestros estudiantes saben.” Y la evaluación estandarizada tiene su lugar. No es el final de todo o ser todo. Y hay otras formas de operar además de las evaluaciones estandarizadas todos los días, y vamos a confiar en nuestros maestros. Tenemos un juicio profesional. Y como dijiste, estamos llenando los vacíos. Y el resultado final más importante es que vamos a priorizar lo que es realmente importante porque nuestros niños necesitan estar juntos social y emocionalmente. Y de nuevo, cuando es físicamente seguro y los médicos lo dicen; obviamente todo eso, me lo tomo muy en serio.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Sin embargo, hay un elemento de la escuela que no creo que nadie se haya dado cuenta. Y bromeé con un profesor el otro día, dije que era mucho mejor cuando sólo tienes 10 evaluadores, ahora tienes 4,000; es decir, ahora que estás practicando tu oficio en los hogares de todos los niños: holy moly. Habla sobre la vulnerabilidad. Por favor, sepan que eso no se me escapa. Es algo muy importante. Así que sí, creo que la gracia, la gratitud, el aprecio, el amor, el respeto. Creo que eso es lo que debería dirigirse a nuestros profesores y a nuestro personal de apoyo. Pero realmente tengo que agradecerte, amigo mío. Eres un gran tipo, un gran colega, una persona maravillosa. Estoy orgulloso de trabajar contigo. Estoy orgulloso de liderar contigo. Y realmente espero con ansias las próximas semanas que tenemos a distancia. Y lo más importante, tan pronto como podamos volver en persona, realmente, realmente espero con ansias eso. Michael, ¿algún pensamiento final con el que quieras terminar nuestro episodio? Sólo voy a agradecerte de nuevo, una sincera gratitud por estar aquí y compartirte.

Michael Buss:

Tengo un punto más. ¿Eres un tipo de Saturday Night Live? ¿Lo ves…?

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Oh, he amado Saturday Night Live desde que tenía ocho años. Sí, lo he estado viendo.

Michael Buss:

Bien, no sé si has visto los dos últimos episodios: el primer episodio después del cierre, ¿verdad? Fue terrible. El episodio de Tom Hanks, ese, fue tan malo.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Sí.

Michael Buss:

Y esta es la cuestión, estas son personas que están en la industria de los medios de comunicación, ¿verdad? Este es su problema. Esto es en lo que son expertos, ¿verdad? Y fue malo, y creo que lo sabían. Y volvieron la semana siguiente, una semana después, y fue mucho mejor. Y esa es una analogía que acabo de dibujar para nosotros. Y no creo que fuéramos tan malos fuera de la puerta, no tan malos como SNL. Así que tenemos eso a nuestro favor.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Eso es correcto. Estábamos mejor.

Michael Buss:

Estábamos mejor fuera de la puerta. Y pienso lo mismo, sin embargo. Cada vez estamos mejor y mejor. Y como dijiste, estamos añadiendo nuevas cosas y nuevas características y nuevos componentes. Y es un buen momento para probar estas cosas porque siento que hay poco riesgo. Ve por ello. Si falla, falla, bien. Bien.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Absolutamente.

Michael Buss:

Lo intentamos. Nuestro corazón está ahí. Lo hacemos por la razón correcta, y luego todo se trata de los niños. Así que sí, gracias. Gracias por esta oportunidad.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Fue impresionante. Muchas gracias. Gracias a los oyentes del Faro 112, y manténganse a salvo ahí fuera.

Dr. Lubelfeld:

Gracias por escuchar el Faro 112, el podcast del Superintendente de Escuelas del Distrito Escolar 112 de North Shore. Somos un distrito escolar público de preescolar a octavo grado en el noreste de Illinois. Este podcast es una fuente de información sobre el distrito escolar, su liderazgo, sus maestros y estudiantes, y su comunidad. Es otra fuente de actualizaciones y una fuente adicional de noticias sobre la cambiante narrativa de la educación pública. Nuestro lema es inspirar, innovar, comprometerse. Este podcast puede ser escuchado y oído en Anchor, Podcasts de Apple, Podcasts de Google, Spotify Breaker, Overcast, radio, Public Stitcher, y otras fuentes se están agregando todo el tiempo. Por favor, vuelve a visitarnos y suscríbete a nosotros para estar al día con lo que está pasando en el Distrito 112. Por favor, también visite nuestro sitio web en www.nssd112.org. Muchas gracias por escuchar y por su interés.

Skip to toolbar